Coffeehouse Thread

46 posts

I'm not sure I like where this is going.

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  • cbae

    @davewill: Do you want us off your lawn?

  • Richard.Hein

    @davewill:  You're not an "old fart", this is uncomfortable thoughts for everyone.  I am trying to just stir up a bit of a debate about what the rights and freedoms of people under such an environment should be.  I personally think of these devices becoming an extension of my own mind, and thus want to record and share any input I desire.  At the same time, it indeed makes me feel very insecure to think that someone could be watching and recording my every move in the future.  Where's the line, what should it look like?  Yeah, you should respect people's rights to privacy, and ask permission, but after a while, if the default is always on ... you'd have to ask everyone or dress yourself up in a Faraday cage or something. 

    Cloaking devices are the only answer.  Good thing there's like, a million kids who all grew up on Harry Potter working on that stuff now.

  • Richard.Hein

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    It's not "when". It's still very much "if". That's why we're having this dialog now, before it comes to pass. You're acting as if it's a foregone conclusion that there are going to be recording devices in every square inch of society. Even if we have such technological capability, we really ought to be asking "why?".

    To me it is a forgone conclusion, yes, and I don't think anything is going to stop it.  Why?  History, virtual time travel, truth, protection, sharing information ... lots of reasons why.  You need the data before you can even know the full benefits that knowledge that data will bring.  And consequences.

  • davewill

    , cbae wrote

    @davewill: Do you want us off your lawn?

    Smiley  I'm currently investigating the feasibility of slipknot masks and C9 jumpsuits for everyone!

  • cbae

    , Richard.Hein wrote

    *snip*

    To me it is a forgone conclusion, yes, and I don't think anything is going to stop it.  Why?  History, virtual time travel, truth, protection, sharing information ... lots of reasons why.  You need the data before you can even know the full benefits that knowledge that data will bring.  And consequences.

    I don't think we need to digitally record every nanosecond of every square inch of the planet for the sake of posterity nor should we want to. Just because you have data doesn't mean you can glean any useful information from that data anyway. 99.999999999% of the events that occur around us is just noise. I don't think it's worth the effort of humans to record everything, everywhere, at all times in the hopes of capturing that 0.000000001% of beneficial information.

    As they say, just because you can doesn't meant that you should. And we most certainly can prevent this "foregone conclusion" now through laws and cultural shaming. "If you walk around with Google Glass, you WILL look like a douche." Scream that from the rooftops.

  • kettch

    @cbae: The cultural shaming part should be pretty easy. It's one thing to be wearing the thing, but If I'm talking to you, and I keep seeing your eyes flick over to look at the display, I'm going to walk away.

    While constantly looking at your phone is still rude, it at least gives others context when you look at it. If you've got a constant stream of data crammed right into your eyeballs, then are you ever really there, or are you more interested in tweets?

    This makes me shudder. I'm by no means a luddite, but this skirts very close to any number of SciFi stories where civilizations collapse because people were directly connected to some shared data network. We can already see shades of that happening today with kids walking around glued to their devices, and tweeting/texting/poking people who are literally in the same room as them.

  • figuerres

    , Richard.Hein wrote

    *snip*

    If you disagree that computer memory is an extension of human memory, then why are these memories made if not for humans to use?  It is not going to be far off, that people will have computer memory integrated into their biological memories.

    I am speaking to the present day fact; Not to the future that may or may not happen.

    if and when we embed chips in our brains to store data then we will have to work out some of the details.

    as far as when we might have such implants.... well given the stuff I have seen it's really a long way off.   the best we have for example in letting a blind person see is a very very crude dot matrix thing.

    I do not know about anyone else but I think most folks will wait a while on this, imagine what happens if the implant goes bad ?  do we want to have problems like old Johnny Mnemonic when he was running out of storage etc.... 

  • Bass

    , kettch wrote

    @Bass: Easy to identify the average folk taking video, but for the pervs it's probably a simple mod to disable it.

    But if someone wants to video/photos of random people there isn't much stopping them glass or no glass. We already crossed that line when we invented small digital cameras and the like.

  • kettch

    @Bass: Indeed. I think the law in most jurisdictions has it right. If you're in a public place, you don't have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Art forms like street photography are highly respected and should be left alone. I was thinking more along the lines of the bathroom scenario, but as you said, we've had inconspicuous cameras for a while now.

  • Sven Groot

    Peter Hamilton very much tends to trend towards these kinds of developments in his books. His latest novel, The Great North Road, has several instances where the police use sensory recordings to help solve a crime. Basically, everyone has ocular implants and they record everything 100% of the time, mostly to augment memory. But it can be shared with others if desired.

    Mind you, in this future every road and building is covered with smart dust, tiny sensory devices that give the police 24/7 coverage of, well, everything. That is, if it hasn't been ripped by criminals, and isn't malfunctioning from lack of maintenance, and isn't being mucked up by snow (the story takes place in Newcastle Tongue Out ).

    In the manga and anime Ghost in the Shell, this goes even further: almost everyone has brain implants, and it's possible for criminals (or the police) to hack someone else's brain to control them or access their memories. I do find this somewhat less likely however, especially since GitS is set in 2030 and there's no way brain implants will have become the norm by then, even if they were invented tomorrow they wouldn't be that commonplace by then. Wink At least Peter Hamilton has the good sense to set his stories further in the future.

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