I assume it was pretty expensive to develop an entire WPF/Silverlight design suite and overhaul most of the presentation layer of VS to aid WPF development in the first place. For this reason, it did not strike me once that MS would suddenly ditch their platforms for some fledging technology used by a smaller portion of the development world.

Maybe it's because I am a student who has only had a few glimpses of "the industry" (working at a major chip manufacturer now) that I can't fathom that sudden roadblock of the base technologies in my projects suddenly dying out, contributing to massive overhauls of training and large dents in budgets. If a technology is getting deprecated, then I understand that something much better will replace it that will carry forward similar principles and some support to transfer from the old to the new. Heck, it will be probably be even easier to do what I have always done, so any additional training required to learn this new technology will be made up during the actual development experience. If it happens to suck, enough people will whine, halting transition to the new until a version 2 comes out that addresses everyone's concerns. I might be wrong, but this seems to be the trend anyway..the new will either be extremely awesome in terms of productivity and coolness or it will suck until the next version when it will be awesome, and in that period in which it does suck, support for the old will stay as people continue to develop for the old tech. Thus, I don't really mind announcements concerning new apis and technologies as the result could either be good now or later. Tongue Out