Coffeehouse Thread

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Kogan slaps 6.8% 'tax' on IE7 users

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  • User profile image
    Ray7

    At first I thought this was a joke

    Kogan had this to say.

    Today at Kogan we've implemented the world's first "Internet Explorer 7 Tax". The new 6.8% tax comes into effect today on all products purchased from Kogan.com by anyone still insistent on using the antique browser.

    But don't worry, unlike other taxes, we're making it easy to get around this one with a simple upgrade away from IE7 Smiley.

    The way we've been able to keep our prices so low is by using technology to make our business efficient and streamlined. One of the things stopping that is our web team having to spend a lot of time making our new website look normal on IE7. This is an extremely old browser, so from today, anyone buying from the site who uses IE7 will be lumped with a 6.8% surcharge - that's 0.1% for each month IE7 has been on the market:

    Okay fair enough and nearly amusing, but in your list of suggestions for alternatives

    Generic Forum Image

    why not include IE8/9? It might be considered fair and would probably stop the whole idea being regarded as a publicity stunt.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    "You deserve to be punished for decisions made by others and beyond your control."

    I can see their point, and that of others doing similar stuff, but I've always disliked that condescending tone towards visitors.

  • User profile image
    Minh

    what is a kogan?

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    , Ray7 wrote

    why not include IE8/9? It might be considered fair and would probably stop the whole idea being regarded as a publicity stunt.

    It is a publicity stunt. A "tax" makes no sense. If one user decides to pay the tax they have to provide full support and incur all of the supposed costs and frustrations all for a few extra pennies. If those pennies pay for the cost and frustration there's not really anything to complain about. If it doesn't, the business model is jacked up beyond belief. Simply not supporting older browsers would make sense. Taxing IE7 (not IE6?) and recommending everything other than IE (8/9/10) is nothing more than someone having a hissy fit and/or hoping for publicity. It's something I would expect from a hobbyist site, not a commercial site. If I were a customer I'd be tempted to downgrade to IE7 when making my next purchase.

    , Minh wrote

    what is a kogan?

    I assume this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kogan_Technologies. TLDR: An Australian electronics manufacturer that's about to go under due to the lack of any business knowledge/savvy.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    Ha, that's funny. As to why not IE8/9, IE8 is the latest IE for WinXP, and IE9 is the latest IE for Win7. People are much more likely to upgrade a browser than upgrade the OS.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    I'd be worried about the IE7 detection...because on my home computer, when using IE9, Youtube tells me I'm using IE7 and it will be depricated soon.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    It is kind of douchy, but I see their point.  If more companies did this, we might drag some of the biggest institutional foot-draggers into the 21st century.

    That said, if it actually cost money to update to later versions, it would certainly backfire on them.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    , Harlequin wrote

    I'd be worried about the IE7 detection...because on my home computer, when using IE9, Youtube tells me I'm using IE7 and it will be depricated soon.

    That's exactly what I was thinking too. Everytime I go to youtube I think "How about working on better browser detection before stopping IE7 support, eh Google?"

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    You know I don't like a lot of things Microsoft does these days but this kind of anything-but-Microsoft approach is very adolescent to say the least. Hate on Sinofsky or Ballmer but IE is a viable browser. It should be in the list of "better" browsers

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    I would tax latest FF actually. It doesn't understand simple max-width: 100%; to input tags. If I don't set the input to ugly width:100%, inputs will be pushed out of container when container gets smaller.

    And it still can't understand standard none-borwser sepcific CSS2.1 box-sizing command.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    cbae

    I viewed the kogan.com site in IE7 compatibility mode, and the site looks like utter sh1t. They're right. It was a complete waste of time for their web team to make their site appear "correctly" in IE7. They completely failed in that effort. Therefore, I see no reason to pay the tax.

    Even though I'm not an IE7 user, I would boycott any retailer that starts acting it's a privilege for you to be able to shop in its store, online or otherwise. Screw those asshats.

     

  • User profile image
    Minh

    , wkempf wrote

    I assume this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kogan_Technologies. TLDR: An Australian electronics manufacturer that's about to go under due to the lack of any business knowledge/savvy.

    It would seem that they are quite a controversial retailer, looking under "Controversies" of the wikipedia link above.

    I like them a lot more already

    JB Hi-Fi

    Ruslan Kogan then bet Terry Smart, the CEO of JB Hi-Fi A$1,000,000 that they would not stock Apple hardware by 14 March 2014.[55] The deed for the bet is still available online, though it has not been accepted.[56]

    In March 2011, Kogan began giving away free HDMI cables to anyone who had bought a TV from JB Hi-Fi in 2011.[57] This was, Kogan said, a bit to expose that "JB are trying to trick people into thinking they need a $200 cable after buying a FULL HD TV. This is simply not the case."[58]

    At the JB Hi-Fi Annual General Meeting in October 2011, a JB shareholder claimed consumers were "being screwed," when responding to the comment, the chairman and CEO of JB Hi-Fi acknowledged the "challenging conditions" they face due to the cheaper prices online.[59]

    In October 2011, Kogan took out a full page ad in Australia's biggest newspaper calling for JB Hi-Fi to change their slogan, "Always Cheapest Prices."[60] JB Hi-Fi did not respond to the challenge.[61]

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    From what I see in tweete, they don't actually charge the tax....it's just a viral ad campaign I think...

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    , ScanIAm wrote

    It is kind of douchy, but I see their point.  If more companies did this, we might drag some of the biggest institutional foot-draggers into the 21st century.

    Well you wouldn't, because no business is going to care more about their employees being charged slightly more for shopping online during work hours than they do about the cost of upgrading/fixing their LoB intranet apps.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    , AndyC wrote

    *snip*

    Well you wouldn't, because no business is going to care more about their employees being charged slightly more for shopping online during work hours than they do about the cost of upgrading/fixing their LoB intranet apps.

    IE has a compatibility mode, right?  I don't care if they fix their internal apps, I'm just tired of showing up at a client that still has IE6 and wonders why they have security issues.

  • User profile image
    Proton2

    Deja Vu.

     

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    , ScanIAm wrote

    *snip*

    IE has a compatibility mode, right?  I don't care if they fix their internal apps, I'm just tired of showing up at a client that still has IE6 and wonders why they have security issues.

    Maybe because they weren't using validated OS. Cool

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    AndyC

    , ScanIAm wrote

    *snip*

    IE has a compatibility mode, right?  I don't care if they fix their internal apps, I'm just tired of showing up at a client that still has IE6 and wonders why they have security issues.

    From memory IE7's backcompat was limited to quirks mode. It wasn't until IE8 that a more comprehensive solution was available.

    Not that I'm defending the practice. Sticking to XP+IE6 is a fools approach, sooner or later you aren't going to have any choice and it'll turn out to be a lot more expensive for businesses that wait rather than take a carefully structured approach right now. We saw much the same when NT4 went out of support and I suspect it will again be a case of XP+IE6 lingering around for a year or so after it's out of support before it truly starts to vanish.

    Part of the problem is that many of the businesses in question were sold web-applications on the grounds it meant they'd never have to worry about client application deployments ever again. Which naturally turned out to be hopelessly untrue.

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