Coffeehouse Thread

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Linux Now Has "Double" The Market Share of Windows

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  • Bass

    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/linux-windows-microsoft-android-ios,20220.html

    Yeah, they are stretching the definition of marketshare by including mobile. But I still find it interesting to see how far this obscure kernel has gone in many areas that don't directly challenge Microsoft's desktop turf.

    And hey, I still also like Linux on the desktop too.

  • cheong

    I don't really care if they mix it or not. They're two different market that have different use.

    I wonder why not add the "device" market to the calculation as well? In that way *nix can approach > 80% marketshare easily. (Things like GPS navigation tablet or car's self-check system runs on *nix AFAIK, mostly because modern Windows don't fit the low memory requirement and didn't run on low power consumption ARM chips at that time)

    Recent Achievement unlocked: Code Avenger Tier 4/6: You see dead program. A lot!
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  • Blue Ink

    Wouldn't that mean that mobile devices constitute some 80% of the total?

  • PaoloM

    but... I thought you couldn't compare  a kernel to an os... @_@

  • cbae

    @PaoloM: Why stop at kernels? Why not go a level lower and compare all of the devices that use FAT32 vs ext3?

  • GoddersUK

    Generic Forum Image

    I heard this has more market share than windows, *nix etc. put together and then multiplied by a really large coefficient.

     EDIT: p.s., I don't believe that graph for a second. For instance I reckon they only started including non-PC devices from 2005 (otherwise a lot of iPhones and "others" were sold effectively overnight). It's also interesting to see how Apple's growth from 2005 has been somewhat slow and how Microsofts growth is going up again. But statistics, you can make them say anything. Especially if you do them badly.

  • magicalclick

    Interesting, can we have a chart compare device market share? Meaning, desktop vs non-desktop (cell and tab) , don't confuse teddy bear with android inside of course, and no Sync in Ford, those don't count.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    Despite some of the more crass and negative comments here I believe Bass has a point. If the comparison is Linux to Windows kernels that sounds pretty fair. Does the chart include Windows embedded too?

    With Microsoft's push to devices I think it make sense to include all of the above. Windows Embedded has been on the market for quite sometime so why shouldn't Ford Sync and the like be included? As developers aren't we interested in more than just hardware that sits in front of people's faces?

  • BitFlipper

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    Does the chart include Windows embedded too?

    Of course not. That won't allow for dramatic forum threads about Linux having twice Windows marketshare to be created, right?

  • magicalclick

    @DeathByVisualStudio: embeded (windows or Linux) are not an interest of me. Of course I cannot define exactly what I am interested in, after all, both Sync and Smart TV support apps. I don't consider them because people move with the hardware, not software. No one cares when the OS is changed in a TV. I care more about people switching OS instead of switching hardware. Of course, I made the thread about irrelevance of Windows Embedded business model. Not that I like seeing Linux taking over embedded spaces, but, I prefer to compare OS market share differently.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    , BitFlipper wrote

    *snip*

    Of course not. That won't allow for dramatic forum threads about Linux having twice Windows marketshare to be created, right?

    And if it was included would it make a difference? I don't think embedded can fit in as many crevasses as Linux but I could be wrong.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • Blue Ink

    @DeathByVisualStudio: The problem is we don't know what we are looking at, and that is pretty disconcerting.

    For instance, what happened in 2004? The iPod, of course, so that has to be what makes Apple jump from 5% to 21%, but something else must have happened that year, to make "Others" jump from zilch to 29%. I cannot remember what might have been so big to make more of a splash than the iPod, maybe it was a number of things, but I cannot really figure this out (unless some specific OS, e.g. Symbian, got "computing device" status in 2004).

    Another disconcerting fact is that Apple stays almost flat after 2004, in the 20's range; flat enough that it's impossible to say when the iPhone or the iPad were introduced in this timeline. Of course the PC business have been growing in the double digits until very recently, so the graph is kind of skewed, but I was still taken by surprise.

    We have an important milestone for our comparisons: 2008. That's when, according to Gartner, the 1 billion PC mark was reached. According to those percentages, there were roughly 500 million Apple devices back then (Mac + iPod + iPhone); and there were about 650 million "Others" devices. Any clue as to what those are supposed to be?

    Fast forward a few years; as I mentioned the PC market keeps growing until very recently, so that billion must have grown significantly, but let's keep it as it's a nice round figure. If PC's are 20% (and that's our conservative estimate of one billion units), there are more than one billion Apple devices out there and more than two billion Android devices (plus the usual 700 million unknown "Others"). Does that even remotely sounds possible? Android gets there in just 4 years, which means that, assuming linear growth, they must have sold some 500 million units per year (without any turnover: every unit sold goes to a new customer).

    The chart isn't bogus, of course, and is probably indicating something important. What I know is it's probably not numbers that can be compared to net applications or similar statistics. Maybe it's units sold that year, maybe it's revenues. Without proper labeling and some background information, any number means pretty much anything.

  • TexasToast

    Well one market makes money selling the OS and the other market does not.   If you have a problem with the one you paid for you can take your problems to that company that sold it to you.  Or as the case here for windows 8 come to C9 and complain.   Linux is just code you take the responsibility for.   It gets popular because you can take it and make it what you want.  I would argue that Linux has many flavors and each flavor should be counted as a separate OS.  

  • evildictait​or

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    *snip*

    And if it was included would it make a difference? I don't think embedded can fit in as many crevasses as Linux but I could be wrong.

    Well, it would at the very least mean that Microsoft could claim credit for every TV in every seat in every airline in the west, as well as every ATM in America and a fair chunk of all of the advertisements in malls and outside shops in America and Europe. There are a lot of Microsoft Embedded machines out there.

  • Blue Ink

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    Well, it would at the very least mean that Microsoft could claim credit for every TV in every seat in every airline in the west, as well as every ATM in America.

    Not every one of them. Both Delta and Continental have in-flight entertainment systems based on Red Hat Linux, and maybe a few others.

  • evildictait​or

    , Blue Ink wrote

    *snip*

    Not every one of them. Both Delta and Continental have in-flight entertainment systems based on Red Hat Linux, and maybe a few others.

    American, United and Air Canada are Windows Embedded for sure.

  • kettch

    @evildictaitor: My bank has Windows on their ATMs. I know that because they use the error "ding" for all of the notifications. The first time I used one of the machines I thought something was wrong.

  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    Well, it would at the very least mean that Microsoft could claim credit for every TV in every seat in every airline in the west, as well as every ATM in America and a fair chunk of all of the advertisements in malls and outside shops in America and Europe. There are a lot of Microsoft Embedded machines out there.

    , Blue Ink wrote

    *snip*

    Not every one of them. Both Delta and Continental have in-flight entertainment systems based on Red Hat Linux, and maybe a few others.

    No doubt Windows Embedded is everywhere.  Perplexed Thanks Blue on the clarification.

    I wonder if Windows Embedded is running my home router or my TV? I bet it would make a cool smart watch. Wink

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