Coffeehouse Thread

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Microsoft may invest in Dell to take company private

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  • cbae
  • wastingtime​withforums

    Investing such large sums is more than a mere helping hand.. are they on their way to a buy-out or at least getting a huge chunk of it?

    How crazy! This will generate only more pissed off OEMs and feed the "MicroApple" image. No one needs MicroApple.

    Ballmer's Apple envy is killing the company.

  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    Now that Microsoft is a "devices" company it kind of makes sense. It will be interesting to see if they ever produce a Surface phone. Maybe made by Dell? Maybe they'll buy out Nokia's hardware division? In any case the rumor mill is certainly creating a strong sense that Microsoft is moving deeper into their OEM's territory. I just wonder how far they will take it? Like Google (lead by example)? Like Apple (sole vendor)?

  • wastingtime​withforums

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    Now that Microsoft is a "devices" company it kind of makes sense.

    The whole approach is crazy. I've wrote about this already. I just don't see what the target audience of all this could be.

    The only target audience I can think of is: People who like Apple products but.. don't like the company itself.

    Think about it, you had three worlds in IT:

    Free for all, but chaotic: Linux + FOSS
    Restricted walled-garden: Apple
    The middle road and ubiquitous: Microsoft (closed source, but pretty much no restrictions what you can do with the OS. You have [had?] also a ton of OEMs to chose from)

    Now Microsoft is transforming into MicroApple, with the goal to have apparently the same modus operandi of Apple. What's the point?! Why not chose the original? The subpar sales of Surface and Windows Phone prove my point - there is no need for Apple II, the target audience for this approach is small.

    What Microsoft should have done instead is concentrate on Android. Android had many weaknesses: It was buggy and laggy, it had also upgrade problems. Microsoft's dev tools are also better than Google's; they should have made Windows Phone as open as possible (allow sideloading etc.) and win over devs with the tooling. The UI should have been moddable too to a certain extend. That would make the system far more consumable for the current Windows users and devs, and enthusiasts. As far as I know, the iPhone is easier to jailbreak than WP, THAT'S NOT A GOOD THING! How was it possible that Android had better Exchange and Outlook synchronization than WP? UNEXCUSABLE (given that MS has the source code for both). WP8 still can't natively synchronize with Outlook - pushing the cloud is more important than winning customers I guess. That's one of Microsoft's core problems too now - pushing "hip things" without alternative, even if that means making customers angry, or even losing customers. 

    Apple itself is beleaguered by Android pretty heavily and losing market share. It can very well be that in the long run Apple finds itself in the same position to Android as it was to Windows in the 90s. Is Apple's position in the long run really that desirable? Ballmer is blinded by Apple's current profits (and "cool"-factor maybe).

    Microsoft trying to be Apple to the letter is madness IMHO.

  • TexasToast

    @wastingtimewithforums:

    You have it all wrong.  This is not a consumer play but Microsoft wants to get serious about business.   Dell sells a lot of servers, switches etc to corporate clients.   This is not a business Apple or Google is in.

  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    @TexasToast: I'm not so sure about that. Microsoft is pushing corporate clients to the cloud. I'm not so sure how an infrastructure company is going to help Microsoft unless they see some advantage in Dell engineers building Microsoft's data centers. Maybe there's still enough juice left in that market but like the PC itself I think it's slowly shrinking.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • wastingtime​withforums

    8 minutes ago, DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    @TexasToast: I'm not so sure about that. Microsoft is pushing corporate clients to the cloud.

    The way they do it is madness too: Raising praises to mad hatter levels. Pffft. Not everyone desires the cloud, they should just accept that and still offer both options equally. Pissing off customers will look them for alternatives, not your cloud (especially when they can't even use cloud services, thanks to bad internet connections or laws prohibiting that).

    Microsoft's Office and Server & Tools divisions are making healthy profits. I just can't understand why they are in such a rush to annoy customers in record time for no good reason. It also creates instability for their developer tools.

  • cbae

    , TexasToast wrote

    @wastingtimewithforums:

    You have it all wrong.  This is not a consumer play but Microsoft wants to get serious about business.   Dell sells a lot of servers, switches etc to corporate clients.   This is not a business Apple or Google is in.

    +1 Dell will give Microsoft an endless supply of servers for Azure.

  • cbae

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    The way they do it is madness too: Raising praises to mad hatter levels. Pffft. Not everyone desires the cloud, they should just accept that and still offer both options equally. Pissing off customers will look them for alternatives, not your cloud (especially when they can't even use cloud services, thanks to bad internet connections or laws prohibiting that).

    Microsoft's Office and Server & Tools divisions are making healthy profits. I just can't understand why they are in such a rush to annoy customers in record time for no good reason. It also creates instability for their developer tools.

    Dell sells out-of-box servers configured with System Center for deploying private clouds. If Microsoft offered the entire bundle themselves, they can price it more competitively.

  • evildictait​or

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    +1 Dell will give Microsoft an endless supply of servers for Azure.

    I think perhaps what a lot of people in this thread are missing is that Dell are pretty hot at selling devices, but they are a whole lot hotter at selling services to business.

    If Microsoft can get Dell to sell even half of all of their new business-products to run off of Azure, they'll take Azure usage through the roof.

  • JoshRoss

    It could be as simple as access to intelectual property and to put the kibosh on any potential Android device coming out of Round Rock. That's some deal, when compared with the Skype debacle.

    Dude! You're getting a MicroDell!

    -Josh

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