Coffeehouse Thread

76 posts

Monopoly Microsoft was more customer friendly than today's "friendly" Microsoft

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    Bass

    Genius indeed, since the law of large numbers states they will collect much more licensing fees. And isn't that the point?

    Big companies like Microsoft just don't decide things like pricing and licensing terms based on gut feelings. There is a lot of market research and business analysis that happens behind the scenes, to maximize revenues and staying power.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    @Craig_Matthews:

    Dick move or not, license terms that tie a software license to a specific computer are totally legit.

    In the USA at least, the first sale doctrine doesn't apply to [most] software (there are some exceptions related to console video games). In other words, in the special case of software, copyright holders retain full distribution/transfer rights over software even after they sold the license to you. This has interesting implications, like they can even restrict you from reselling it even entirely unused (or require you be an "authorized reseller").

    This is NOT the case for other copyrighted works like movies or books where copyright holders lose the distribution right after the first sale. Although copyright holders MAY be able regain distribution rights after the first sale if and only if the works in question cross a national border, but that's to be decided by the Supreme Court soon.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , Bass wrote

    Genius indeed, since the law of large numbers states they will collect much more licensing fees.

    Somehow I doubt that. The MS activation hotline is usually less strict than what the license agreements actually dictate. My guess is that the hotline will overlook the issue and activate it regardless. Or else they will be drowning in *-storm.

    But if they really insist on this BS, then piracy will go up sky high or Office will be replaced, at least on the customer side. Most private customers don't have complex-documents.

    The licensing is more strict than most of those custom-business software packages. It's way worse than a dongle. They have really smoked a strong one here.

    And as I said, I am really astounded that they are at their most evil towards their customers when they are most besieged by competitors. Really strange. I don't think they teach that one in business schools.

  • User profile image
    kettch

    @wastingtimewithforums: Most "private customers" aren't affected by this at all. The only people who care are pundits.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , kettch wrote

    @wastingtimewithforums: Most "private customers" aren't affected by this at all. The only people who care are pundits.

    Most people buy new computers once in a while. It's quite the news that you can't simply re-install retail Office on your new PC. I think it's actually the first time this happens with mainstream retail software.

    And if they really tied it to hard drives, then this will affect lots of people. HDs aren't exactly the reliability masters.

    And the loss of the family pack will affect most private customers. The subscription model is almost always a hefty price increase in this case.

  • User profile image
    kettch

    @wastingtimewithforums: Most people buy computers rarely enough that it's not going to make a difference. I'm not going to panic about the hard drive rumor, because the people who insist believing every single negative rumor and going into a rage over something that turns out to be false have ended up being wrong 99% of the time.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    Most people buy new computers once in a while. It's quite the news that you can't simply re-install retail Office on your new PC. I think it's actually the first time this happens with mainstream retail software.

    Most people who buy a new computer get Office installed on it by the store when they upgrade. The full version of Office isn't cheap - for sure - but most people don't get the full package. They get Home & Student, which is $120 boxed - it's cheaper if it's bundled with the laptop.

    Also: when was the last time you bought a laptop with office bundled, and it came with a CD that you could use to install Office on other computers?

     

     

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , kettch wrote

    @wastingtimewithforums: Most people buy computers rarely enough that it's not going to make a difference.

    What is the point of the license change then?

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    The full version of Office isn't cheap - for sure - but most people don't get the full package. They get Home & Student, which is $120 boxed - it's cheaper if it's bundled with the laptop.

    Um, that's the whole point. Home & Student boxed is now limited to just one license, and is not transferable. If that's not a price increase, I don't know what is.

    edit: AND I DON'T GET IT: If according to you guys it's not affecting most people at all - why the tougher licensing? Of course they calculate that it WILL affect and thus increase the bottom line. Otherwise it doesn't make sense toughing it up.

    And if it really isn't affecting anybody, why the heck doing it then? For the bad press?

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    Um, that's the whole point. Home & Student boxed is now limited to just one license, and is not transferable. If that's not a price increase, I don't know what is.

    How many people who use Home & Student bought it as a boxed edition and transferred it at least once during the period when they owned their laptop, as a percentage of all Office 2010 users do you think?

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    How many people who use Home & Student bought it as a boxed edition and transferred it at least once during the period when they owned their laptop, as a percentage of all Office 2010 users do you think?

    Why the the license change then?

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    Why the the license change then?

    Because Microsoft are moving away from selling boxed editions of Office.

    These terms btw are not new. They were there in Office 2010 for OEM editions of Office:

    (OEM)

    15. TRANSFER TO A THIRD PARTY. You may transfer the software directly to
    a third party only with the licensed device, the Certificate of
    Authenticity label, and this agreement. Before the transfer, that party
    must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the
    software. You may not retain any copies.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    Because Microsoft are moving away from selling boxed editions of Office. 

    So, it's a ploy to force people onto Office 365, agreed?

    If it's a ploy to force people, then this change is affecting enough people it seems (otherwise the ploy would be pointless).

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    So, it's a ploy to force people onto Office 365, agreed?

    If it's a ploy to force people, then this change is affecting enough people it seems (otherwise the ploy would be pointless).

    Of the total number of Office licences sold last year, how many of them do you think were shrink-wrapped CDs, versus how many were OEM or MSDN installs?

    But of course, be my guest and assume that there's some massive conspiracy going on here.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    Of the total number of Office licences sold last year, how many of them do you think were shrink-wrapped CDs, versus how many were OEM or MSDN installs?

    And again, why the change in licensing then? If it's so pointless, why have they bothered at all? (not to mention the bad press and bad amazon reviews as the result).

    But of course, be my guest and assume that there's some massive conspiracy going on here.

    So there's absolutely no sub-text regarding these changes? Is the licensing department simply just bored?

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    And again, why the change in licensing then? If it's so pointless, why have they bothered at all? (not to mention the bad press and bad amazon reviews as the result).

    Because the old EULA contained terms for a product install type that Microsoft is moving to no longer support.

    This isn't about deprecating Office in favour of Office 365. It's about deprecating shrinked wrapped CD installs in favour of OEM and MSDN web installs.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    This isn't about deprecating Office in favour of Office 365. It's about deprecating shrinked wrapped CD installs in favour of OEM and MSDN web installs.

    And thus all the toughing up is needed? If it's no ploy for Office 365, then why the toughing it up?

    Downloading the Office installer from a website instead of getting a DVD automatically leads to non-transferable licenses, one-device only licensing and the loss of the family pack?

    in favour of OEM [...] installs

    So, the ideal future is Office 365 or bust? Basically, you either ONLY get it through the OEM pre-installed with a new PC or you MUST sign-up for Office 365?

    Sure, not exactly your words, but that's the conclusion.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    So there's absolutely no sub-text regarding these changes? Is the licensing department simply just bored?

    No, you're right. All of the lawyers at MS go to the big black tower in the centre of Redmond once a month, do a dance around a campfire and peer into the portal into hell where their illuminati overlords instruct them on what clever phrases to add to EULAs as part of their evil plan to somehow conquer the world.

    Maybe there's subtext and maybe there isn't. But life's too short to spend your life trying to squeeze a conspiracy out of every single statement that comes out of Microsoft. 

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.