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Programming in Visual Basic or c#

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  • User profile image
    christ_child

    I have been thinking of getting into a little coding lately.  Now, i know at 40 years old Im pretty much past my prime but i was wondering if anyone could point me to some good resources for someone just learning the art.

    God bless you all

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    http://www.charlespetzold.com/key/index.html

    Charles Petzold
    Programming in the Key of C#
    A Primer for Aspiring Programmers

    Charles is the best...

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    @christ_child: Once you learn programming, the language you use doesn't matter. C# would be a good choice because it would give you a running start with the syntax of other languages like Java and C++.

    With that said, I've come to prefer VB for its more human language.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    If you don't have any other programming languages before you then I'd start with C#. It's perhaps less intuitive to start with than VB, but it's syntax is much closer to real money languages of C#, Java, Javascript, C++ and C than the older and less industrially used VB, VB.Net, BASIC and so on. C# is also the preferred language at most companies I've seen (including Microsoft), so if it's jobs or money you want at the end, I'd go with C#.

    Also you'll find pretty quickly that there's more and better examples and documentation out there for C# than there is for VB.

    Ultimately if you're just programming for fun, it doesn't matter which one you use.

    Also 40 isn't past your prime. A lot of the Windows kernel developers are about 40 (not all, but many of them), and they're the best in their field.

  • User profile image
    golnazal

    Channel 9 is launching a new tutorial series on how to program in C#. In the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

  • User profile image
    ManipUni

    I'd say C# because it is closer to JavaScript which is perhaps the most popular language in the world at the moment. It is also similar to many other popular languages such as Java as used on the Android OS and Object C as used on the iPhone.  

    Visual Basic is slightly easier to read but frankly if you want to make software that actually matters it isn't that useful as either a learning exercise or as a programming language. 

    Nothing of value is written in Visual Basic.    

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , ManipUni wrote

    I'd say C# because it is closer to JavaScript which is perhaps the most popular language in the world at the moment. It is also similar to many other popular languages such as Java as used on the Android OS and Object C as used on the iPhone.  

    Java is the most popular language in the world followed by C++ then C. Javascript is a long way down that list.

    Nothing of value is written in Visual Basic.    

    That's a bit harsh. The Visual Basic compiler is written in Visual Basic, as is a substantial fraction of the world's banking system.

  • User profile image
    ManipUni

    Java is the most popular language in the world followed by C++ then C. Javascript is a long way down that list.

    Most of those lists are based on number of job adverts containing key words, but as you and I well know Javascript is rarely explicitly listed in the advert even if it is almost always an expected part of the job role.    

    "Web Developer" - Javascript 
    "ASP.net" - Javascript
    "PHP" - Javascript
    "Java, Tomcat, enterprise systems" - Javascript 
    etc  

    That's a bit harsh. The Visual Basic compiler is written in Visual Basic, as is a substantial fraction of the world's banking system.

    It is a little harsh but not entirely untrue. Visual Basic 6 had its little spotlight moment but I think it is safe to say that VB6 is dying and C# has long since replaced it. Likely the largest single use of VB-style syntax at the moment is to write Excel macros, and nobody is hiring for that within its own right. 

    As much as I admire Visual Basic for its history, I think it has created a future which it cannot be apart of. There is no space for VB.net, just JS, C++, and C#.    

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    What kind of result to you want to achieve? In general, learning C# will give to a step into the programing field. But, what kind of ultimate result you want to get? What I mean is, C# does not define HTML, no CSS, no Flash Videos, no database, and many other things.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    spivonious

    , ManipUni wrote

    Nothing of value is written in Visual Basic.    

    We run a multi-million dollar company off of software built with VB. It has feature parity with C# now so use what you know. We came from a VB4/5/6 background, so VB.NET was the logical choice.

  • User profile image
    cbae

    , ManipUni wrote

    *snip*

    Most of those lists are based on number of job adverts containing key words, but as you and I well know Javascript is rarely explicitly listed in the advert even if it is almost always an expected part of the job role.    

    "Web Developer" - Javascript 
    "ASP.net" - Javascript
    "PHP" - Javascript
    "Java, Tomcat, enterprise systems" - Javascript 
    etc

    *snip*

    At the same time, NONE of those positions would be for programming exclusively in JavaScript or mostly in JavaScript or even 50% in JavaScript.

  • User profile image
    LHalstrom

    evildictait‚Äčor wrote 

    *snip*

    Java is the most popular language in the world followed by C++ then C. Javascript is a long way down that list. 

     

    Where's your list? 

    According to TIOBE: http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/paperinfo/tpci/index.html

    And don't tell me about C++/Obj-C being similar, cause with that sense C# is just an extended version of Java, you can almost copy paste Java code into C# (even pretty complex ones) and it'll work, the things that set them apart are the libraries and the advanced features of C#.

     

     

     

    ManipUni wrote 

    *snip* 

    Most of those lists are based on number of job adverts containing key words, but as you and I well know Javascript is rarely explicitly listed in the advert even if it is almost always an expected part of the job role.     

    Actually, TIOBE for example is more based on the number of published articles/codes/etc. Yep, a lot of CGI developers will have to write a few lines in Javascript every now and then, but for most of them the amount of Javascript code is negligible compared to server side code. 

    It's just wrong to say "it's the most popular language", when its share of written lines of code overall out there in the world is actually pretty little.

  • User profile image
    IDWMaster

    Choose whatever language you feel most comfortable with. Visual Basic.NET is not commonly used, but can do most of the things that C# can (after all; they are both .NET languages, so they can call into all of the same libraries. I've been able to code in C# for most of my career, and every once in a while, someone has a VB.NET question, and I can usually answer it using my .NET expertise, without even knowing much VB.NET specific stuff). C++ is a good language if you've programmed before, or at least have a basic understanding of how computer memory works. I've programmed in C++ and C# before, and personally, haven't noticed any performance difference between the two (even when I've ported C++ libraries to C#). However, there are some things that are actually simpler to do in C++; such as direct memory allocation (if you need very fine-grained control over memory), signal processing (mostly due to the number of C++ libraries out there that already do most of the work for you), writing drivers, and writing DirectX 11 programs for Windows 8 (although, I do often write in C++/CLI and invoke managed commands from my DirectX 11 C++ programs). 

    Bottom line: Code in the language you like the best. No one language is 'better' than another (even Visual Basic.NET still has its uses), and HAVE FUN!

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , spivonious wrote

    *snip*

    We run a multi-million dollar company off of software built with VB. It has feature parity with C# now so use what you know. We came from a VB4/5/6 background, so VB.NET was the logical choice.

    You have my sympathy.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , spivonious wrote

    *snip*

    We run a multi-million dollar company off of software built with VB. It has feature parity with C# now so use what you know. We came from a VB4/5/6 background, so VB.NET was the logical choice.

    You have my sympathy.

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @W3bbo: Maybe someone within the VS group can share the latest stats.  Last I heard it was roughly a 50/50 split.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , davewill wrote

    @W3bbo: Maybe someone within the VS group can share the latest stats.  Last I heard it was roughly a 50/50 split.

    That 50% of CLR projects created in VS are VB isn't very meaningful: one can argue that beginners choose VB, and as beginners they're bound to create a larger number of small projects, thus skewing the figures in VB's favour.

    The evidence ( http://www.devtopics.com/most-popular-programming-languages/ ) suggests that as VB jobs take up only a small fraction of all software jobs, that it follows only a fraction of code is VB (I feel like inserting a snarky comment about how VB's verbose syntax leads to more lines of code Wink ).

  • User profile image
    elmer

    If you are starting with no experience in either - go with C#

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