Coffeehouse Thread

32 posts

Sheesh, what is it now?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , magicalclick wrote

    @evildictaitor:

    it facinates me how Microsoft continuously trying to make web a platform-dependent community. And yet, it cannot be done when web is never owned by anyone, especially the FF/Chrome era..

    Say what? 

    A) The web has always been platform dependent - from the days when devs would program for Firefox and IE6 separately (and then the fun days of IE6, IE7 + Firefox) to the modern delights of which browser/phone/pad/laptop combination are we using today.

    B) Microsoft's platforms have always been closed. Arguably the main selling feature of Windows is that developers who write for Windows produce products that either don't work at all on other OSes, or work pretty badly (with a few exceptions).

    C) Microsoft is a platforms company - as is Apple, as is Twitter, as is Google. In fact, Facebook's entire valuation was pretty much entirely based off the back of "Facebook is a closed platform". If it was just a place to store your photographs and chat with your friends it would have a total value in the small millions, not the billions.

    You need to have your eyes pretty firmly shut and your fingers pretty deep in your ears and singing LA LA LA pretty loudly to think that owning platforms as a way of making money is dead, or is coming to an end soon.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    @GoddersUK:

    How about pizza too? It could be like a birthday party.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , magicalclick wrote

    @evildictaitor:

    it facinates me how Microsoft continuously trying to make web a platform-dependent community. And yet, it cannot be done when web is never owned by anyone, especially the FF/Chrome era..

    Umm, yea, because google's Chrome apps aren't trying to make the web a platform-dependant community. No, not at all.

     

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    @evildictaitor:

    @blowdart:

    You guys do have valid points. I simply have different perspective than you guys. Sadly my message isn't interpreted as expected.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , evildictait‚Äčor wrote

     

    C) Microsoft is a platforms company - as is Apple, as is Twitter, as is Google. In fact, Facebook's entire valuation was pretty much entirely based off the back of "Facebook is a closed platform". If it was just a place to store your photographs and chat with your friends it would have a total value in the small millions, not the billions.


    Twitter wasn't a platform, it was an API. Then they realised they can't make money being an API, they need captive eyeballs, so they produced their own (limited) mobile clients and now are working hard to kill off any client their don't control. Which is backfiring of course.

     

  • User profile image
    Charles

    @blowdart: True. Platform is an overloaded term... There's the platform - so, x86/64 or ARM or Windows or OSX or iOS or Android, etc... Then there's the API surfaces. ABI surfaces, too... These are what platform-specific apps are written for (well, to).

    C

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , Charles wrote

    @blowdart: True. Platform is an overloaded term... There's the platform - so, x86/64 or ARM or Windows or OSX or iOS or Android, etc... Then there's the API surfaces. ABI surfaces, too... These are what platform-specific (pieces of or all encompassing) apps are written for (well, to).

    C

    Traditionally, x86/x64 and ARM are referred to as the architecture rather than the platform, but you're right. Software is a stack of technologies, and to anyone above you, you're part of the platform and anyone below is part of your platform.

  • User profile image
    Charles

    @evildictaitor: Indeed.

    C

  • User profile image
    kettch

    @wastingtimewithforums: You speak truth. We can't trust anybody to support anything very long. That is why I always build every computer from raw elements, and use a software stack that I've written 100% on my own. The same goes for my car, my house, my clothes, my food, my air, my water...

    Microsoft won't drop W8. If they do move towards a more rapid release cycle, it will mean incremental refinements every year or so instead of big changes every three years. The UX we see in 8 is here to stay. Mwahahahaha!

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    @wastingtimewithforums:

    Are they really going to release newer version in 2013? I hope it is true because at least I can pray they are going to fix the broken taskbar. I love taskbar.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Okay, I don't agree with the tone of this thread, but I do agree that not releasing IE10 on Windows 7 is a seriously bad idea for the web.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , Sven Groot wrote

    Okay, I don't agree with the tone of this thread, but I do agree that not releasing IE10 on Windows 7 is a seriously bad idea for the web.

    This came out of a KB article I believe.


    You'll notice now it says

    Note Internet Explorer 10 is included in Windows 8. It is not yet available for Windows 7.


    The yet wasn't there before. I pinged some people, heh.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    @blowdart:Hehe. It never ceases to amaze me how some people can jump on the wording of a single, possibly ambiguous, statement in a relatively unimportant webpage and assume it overrides roadmapped products that have been announced and discussed for well over a year.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , blowdart wrote

    Note Internet Explorer 10 is included in Windows 8. It is not yet available for Windows 7.


    The yet wasn't there before. I pinged some people, heh.

    Good.

    , AndyC wrote

    @blowdart:Hehe. It never ceases to amaze me how some people can jump on the wording of a single, possibly ambiguous, statement in a relatively unimportant webpage and assume it overrides roadmapped products that have been announced and discussed for well over a year.

    Well, that webpage, together with the ominous complete silence on IE 10 for Win 7 in the past eight months, together with all the other recent MS surprises, can lead to these conclusions.

    I am glad I was proven wrong this time.

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.