Coffeehouse Thread

20 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

Should I place my WP7 phone away from my router?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    I've got my Windows Phone configured to use my wireless router at home.  I'm wondering if it is wise to not place the phone really close to the router?

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @Doctor Who: Depends on the signal strength you have the router set to.  If it is 100% then it would be better to keep a 6 foot+ distance.  Think of your router as another person having a conversation with you, except they are speaking through a bullhorn.  Smiley

  • User profile image
    Bas

    Why... would that matter to the phone?

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    They're both on 2.4GHz, no? I find that you can get a good estimate of the interference range of a phone by placing it near a speaker and then calling it. Move it away from the speaker until the noise stops and you have your range. I find it's about 1-2 feet for most phones.

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @Bas: I'm assuming he was using his wireless connection with the phone.

    @Doctor Who: If you are not using the phone on the WLAN connection then it doesn't matter because the cell signals are on a different frequency from the router's possible frequencies.

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    Wifi is disabled automatically in lock screen. So, technically you are not really using wifi as you expected.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    It sounds as if I'd be better off not having my phone new a speaker, rather than the router.  But I'll try keeping it at least 2 feet away.

    I am using the WLAN of my router with my phone.  Saves having to use my 3G connection when I'm home.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    But why would it matter if the phone is really close to the router? I've never seen a wireless antenna explode because of a too powerful signal or something like that.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    But why would it matter if the phone is really close to the router? I've never seen a wireless antenna explode because of a too powerful signal or something like that.

  • User profile image
    cbae

    @Bas: OTOH, a powerful signal is probably good for battery life.

  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    Does it matter if I have my phone close to a PC monitor?

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , Doctor Who wrote

    Does it matter if I have my phone close to a PC monitor?

    No, but watch out for your mouse and keyboard. Whenever I have my iPhone close to my keyboard I sometimes get a stream of 'ssssss' characters sent down the line. I have no idea why this is, but presumably interference as my keyboard isn't shielded from radiation - neither are speakers and mobile phone interference with speakers is most irritating.

  • User profile image
    BitFlipper

    Just because a transmitter and receiver's frequencies are not the same, doesn't mean there can't be any interference. If the transmitter signal is strong enough, it could still overload the receiver's input circuit, or swamp the weak signal that the receiver is trying to lock onto.

    But it depends on various things like signal strength ratio of the two signals, the type of receiver circuit, the ability of the receiver to reject frequencies outside the band (it is not infinite), etc, and it may or may not be a problem in this case.

  • User profile image
    davewill

    In addition to what BitFlipper stated, most home routers provide channels 1 through 11.  Each of those channels overlaps the channel on either side of it.  So 1 and 2 overlap on the high side of 1 and low side of 2.  2 and 3 overlap on the high side of 2 and low side of 3.  3 and 4 overlap on the high side of 3 and low side of 4. ... etc.

    The frequencies thrown out over the analog air are not nice clean entities.  Signals change over distance and with other environmental effects.  Receivers are tasked with filtering out the noise and letting in the signals that most accurately fit the channel.

    @Bas: antennea explode ... that's funny.  It isn't like the router is microwaving the phone or vice-versa.  The power involved in the signals is not that high.  It is just less optimal (i.e. prone to more wireless errors) when they are very close.  If I had a megaphone (me router) and you did not (you phone) and we stand face to face and try to carry on a conversation we will be successful.  However, you will need to work harder to discern what I'm blasting at you.  I will probably have to repeat myself at various times throughout the converstation but eventually we will be successful.  It is not "optimal" but it will work.  When I back off a reasonable distance our conversation is more likely to be successful without as many repeats.  Not to mention your receivers (ears) won't ring anymore. Smiley

    Some more info.  The lower the frequency the better the choice for an environment in which the singal needs to bounce.  The higher the frequency the better the choice for an environment in which the signal needs to penetrate obstructions.  Lower frequencies are better for shorter distances but a wider cone of coverage.  Higher frequencies are better for longer distances and a shorter cone of coverage.  Higher channels equate to higher frequencies (I believe that is the case for all signal ratings but correct me if I'm wrong someone).

    NOTE: post a correction to anything I have stated wrong.  My knowledge is learned from doing wireless surveys in the past and nothing from a formal school.

     

    @Doctor WhoMadW3bbo: I think every electronic device emits some level of EMI (electro-magnetic interference).  The degree of shielding and power involved will vary by device, manufacturer, etc.  I had an old CRT monitor (way back) that would create a 3 foot wireless black hole across all 3 dimensions.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    It is just less optimal (i.e. prone to more wireless errors) when they are very close.

    I had no idea that this would be the case. Weird. Thanks!

  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    @W3bbo: Thank you for that info.

  • User profile image
    elmer

    @spivonious: Microwaves are also 2.4Ghz band I believe... so it's probably not a good idea to put your phone into a microwave.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    , davewill wrote

    @Doctor WhoMadW3bbo: I think every electronic device emits some level of EMI (electro-magnetic interference).  The degree of shielding and power involved will vary by device, manufacturer, etc.

    Indeed, and that's the basis for banning the use of electronic devices during take-off and landing of an aircraft. In practice, almost nothing you carry actually has much chance of interfering (even a cell-phone not set to airplane mode), but from the FAA's point of view it's easier to ban everything than to try and determine exactly which devices are safe and which aren't, and from the flight attendant's point of view it's a lot easier to check if someone's using a device rather than what device they're using and whether it's on the safe list. Smiley

    @elmer: An acquaintance of mine had their computer in the kitchen, near the microwave. This created some weird interference effects on the (CRT) monitor whenever the microwave was being used. This did not speak well of the shielding of either the monitor or the microwave. Big Smile

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.