Whether or not an interface is intuitive (familiar) is not the key point.  People will quickly adjust to and accept an non-familiar interface as long as it provides real improvements in usability.  If the interface doesn't improve, or worse yet harms usability, the interface change will be rejected, and the user will be even more unhappy at putting effort into learning something different that doesn't work as well.

The concept of "superior" is a much more difficult, and subjective, concept.  It is also more important for the success of a UI than familiarity.

The issue raised by Dr. Herbie is discoverability.  People have to be able to figure out how to use your interface, and the majority of people are not going to go through tutorials and tips to figure them out, or memorize a bunch of shortcut keys.  If a user needs to phone a friend or Google to find out how to use your interface, you have a problem and an unhappy user.

(This is a general comment and makes no implications good or bad about Win 8 in particular.)