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The cut-price Tablet market

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  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    A month or so ago Tesco (British Wal-Mart) launched a tablet, now Argos have just launched theirs.

    The developer elite will disparage the build quality, but between Google, Amazon, Tesco and now Argos, the low end tablet is covered, not to include Samsung and HTC models.

    What amazes me is the fact that the OS is irrelevant, almost as irrelevant as a Windows developer on devices is becoming. Around 10 years ago when I moved to C/C++ based development, C++ and .NET seemed to offer the best options for a career, and in general, I have managed to create a respectable career, as Microsoft offered the best development platform, and the market more importantly was rapacious for these skills.

    Each time I watch cable TV, and go through the shopping channels, they all are selling cut price tablets like Tesco and Argos, and seeing as most universities teach Java and not C#, I can only see things going one way at the moment.

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    IMO people will always pay for quality

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    @vesuvius: I'm afraid you're right. I spend most of my time in java these days writing Android apps. Our client front-end is still ASP.NET but there's no reason it needs to be. It's only a matter of time before licensing costs, cloud expenses, new talent with open source roots, and/or some other catalyst pushes us toward a non-Microsoft future. It's sad considering the years many of us have spent in the Microsoft camp.

    , Ian2 wrote

    IMO people will always pay for quality

    IMO only if they can afford it.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • User profile image
    Ian2

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    IMO only if they can afford it.

     

    You would think.

  • User profile image
    bondsbw

    , vesuvius wrote

    and seeing as most universities teach Java and not C#, I can only see things going one way at the moment.

    I've worked at a university recently for 10 years, and that fact hasn't changed the entire time.  Actually, it moved somewhat from mostly C++ and a little Java, to mostly Java, a little C++ and Python and others.  C# has never been a big deal because it comes from Microsoft, and academia hates Microsoft.[citation needed]

    Whether C# will live or die shouldn't be judged based on whether it's taught in CS classes.

  • User profile image
    RealBboy360

    If you know Java, you know C#.  Not a big difference, as long as you know what it capable of doing, just bing it to get the snippet.

    As for expense, express versions are free.  A shared web host with a shared db is $5 a month.  Pro version of VS is $500.

    It's much faster to cost efficient to build LOB apps with ASP.NET webforms than it is Java.  

  • User profile image
    elmer

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    *snip*

    IMO only if they can afford it.

    ... and even then, only if the difference is obvious and important to them.

  • User profile image
    Kental2

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    IMO only if they can afford it.

    I don't think I agree.  People seem to be able to find the money to buy Apple products that cost 3-4 times as much as their competitors.  They release a new phone every... what, year?  And the phone barely changes from version to version, yet some people will religiously buy each new phone.  I know plenty of people who live paycheck to paycheck and are always complaining about money who somehow manage to find the money for their new Apple products that cost a frankly embarrassing amount of money.

    That actually applies to the world outside of technology too.  I have several friends who are, again, living paycheck to paycheck, yet they can afford to go out drinking on the weekend and easily drop $150.  Or buy cartons of cigarettes at $30 a pop fairly frequently.

    I think if people want something enough, they find a way to get the money for it.

    Edit: Fix amusing typo.

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    I have had friends/acquaintances turn down my 'previous years model' because they already have the latest (or equivalent) themselves - and I am talking about people who are out of work.

    It is an odd world we live in.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    , Kental2 wrote

    *snip*

    I don't think I agree.  People seem to be able to find the money to buy Apple products that cost 3-4 times as much as their competitors.

    This is true of the "hipsters". but lets be honest, Apple hardware lasts, and unlike Android or Windows (up till 7) you needed to upgrade your hardware to run the latest versions. Apple has always let you upgrade iOS versions whatever model you might have. My 2 year old iPad is running iOS7, my 2 year old HTC Sensation XL has not had an update in over a year. In fact I moved to an iPhone partly for this reason as it is riddled with bugs. Anyone remember the Vista upgrade debacle?

    I think both you and Ian2 are being a little "sweeping", in stating that all Apple users want to run the latest model. Something else to consider is that  "hipsters" that upgrade like automatons, usually factor in that they lose very little money in trading their current hardware for new, nothing the Surface, WP8 or Android devices can hold claim to as their used price is very poor

  • User profile image
    Blue Ink

    , RealBboy360 wrote

    If you know Java, you know C#.  Not a big difference, as long as you know what it capable of doing, just bing it to get the snippet.

    I think that's a myth. These days the syntax is a minor hurdle in getting to be proficient in a language; the bulk of the work is getting to know the libraries and frameworks at your disposal and, I would add, the platform. I suspect it's a lot easier for a VB.NET programmer to learn C#, despite the alien syntax, than it would be for a Java programmer to do the same.

    Also, even though the two languages were very similar at the beginning, they went their own separate ways. You can probably still morph a Java program and make it compile in C#, but the result is not necessarily good C# code.

  • User profile image
    RealBboy360

    , Blue Ink wrote

    *snip*

    I think that's a myth. These days the syntax is a minor hurdle in getting to be proficient in a language; the bulk of the work is getting to know the libraries and frameworks at your disposal and, I would add, the platform. I suspect it's a lot easier for a VB.NET programmer to learn C#, despite the alien syntax, than it would be for a Java programmer to do the same.

    Also, even though the two languages were very similar at the beginning, they went their own separate ways. You can probably still morph a Java program and make it compile in C#, but the result is not necessarily good C# code.

    Part of being a programmer is learning new frameworks or libraries, or how to compile for a specific version.  If you're a C# asp.net programmer and you want to write a C# windows phone app, you have to learn xaml and a other things.  Even switching from different frameworks in Java is a learning new things.  In Java you got so many different, IDEs, servers, ORMs, other 3rd party apps, and tons of different frameworks for web programming.  Moving from Java to ASP.NET is very easy to do.  Even I did it.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    @RealBboy360: I'd think that the biggest hurdle in moving from Java to .NET would be the difference in the eventing system. Everything else is pretty similar.

  • User profile image
    TheJoe

    @Kental

    Or buy cartons of cigarettes at $30 a pop fairly frequently. [/quote]

    Where the hell do you live?  Double that in Texas!

  • User profile image
    Kental2

    @TheJoe: Sorry, I'm a bit out of touch in cigarette pricing department Tongue Out  I don't smoke myself.

  • User profile image
    11101110

    2 days ago, Blue Ink wrote

    *snip*

    I think that's a myth. These days the syntax is a minor hurdle in getting to be proficient in a language; the bulk of the work is getting to know the libraries and frameworks at your disposal and, I would add, the platform. I suspect it's a lot easier for a VB.NET programmer to learn C#, despite the alien syntax, than it would be for a Java programmer to do the same.

    Meet the abomination that is Spring.NET

    http://springframework.net/

    You'll think it's Java, until you realize that there is no POM file and everything is systematically broken from within.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    Looks like another best seller is hitting the shelves for Christmas at ALDI.

    I think the popularity due to the price, Yes, but mostly because there is room for manufacturers to make some return.

  • User profile image
    brich

    , vesuvius wrote

    *snip*

    This is true of the "hipsters". but lets be honest, Apple hardware lasts, and unlike Android or Windows (up till 7) you needed to upgrade your hardware to run the latest versions. Apple has always let you upgrade iOS versions whatever model you might have. My 2 year old iPad is running iOS7, my 2 year old HTC Sensation XL has not had an update in over a year. In fact I moved to an iPhone partly for this reason as it is riddled with bugs. Anyone remember the Vista upgrade debacle?

    I think both you and Ian2 are being a little "sweeping", in stating that all Apple users want to run the latest model. Something else to consider is that  "hipsters" that upgrade like automatons, usually factor in that they lose very little money in trading their current hardware for new, nothing the Surface, WP8 or Android devices can hold claim to as their used price is very poor

    I don't think one needs to be a 'hipster' to appreciate the ease of upgrade offered in Apple's walled garden. And, it would be inaccurate to sweep all users of any platform with a simplistic broad brush, right?

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