Coffeehouse Thread

73 posts

The hardest part about programming is...

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    I'll start this list.

    The hardest part about programming is conceiving ten perfectly good ideas and throwing nine of them away.

    -Josh

  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    Programming is easy, design is hard.

  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    @brian.shapiro: I think that I understand where you are going. If you were to split the world into two parts, finding the problem and offering a solution, what would you call the later, in terms of a process?

    -Josh

    <snip source="wikipedia">

    Hoc and Nguyen-Xuan define computer programming as "the process of transforming a mental plan in familiar terms into one compatible with the computer."

    </snip>

     

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    That empty feeling inside when you have to defer to code you did not write.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    @JoshRoss: As a corallary, "Forcing yourself to follow the concept of YAGNI."

    Hi, I'm ScanIAm, I'm a GoldPlateAholic.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    , MasterPie wrote

    That empty feeling inside when you have to defer to code you did not write.

    ++

  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    @MasterPie: The best code is no code. If I find someone's more elegant solution to a problem, I take it. For example, LINQ to anything; I've written all sorts of things, prior to LINQ, that could just be thrown away now.

    -Josh

  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    , JoshRoss wrote

    @brian.shapiro: I think that I understand where you are going. If you were to split the world into two parts, finding the problem and offering a solution, what would you call the later, in terms of a process?

    -Josh

    <snip source="wikipedia">

    Hoc and Nguyen-Xuan define computer programming as "the process of transforming a mental plan in familiar terms into one compatible with the computer."

    </snip>

     

    What would you say the difference is between coding and programming? In my view the two are pretty similar concepts.

    Design is about working out the interface -- whether thats the user interface, some cross-application interface, the interface of the different parts of one program, or different processes of one function. Programming is going about and implementing that design. I consider it to be more about knowing a skillset than about creativity, its the most tedious and boring part of making a piece of software.

     

  • User profile image
    Blue Ink

    @JoshRoss:

    1) Taking up the courage to start from scratch.

    2) Resisting the urge of doing that endlessly.

  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    , brian.​shapiro wrote

    What would you say the difference is between coding and programming? In my view the two are pretty similar concepts.

    Design is about working out the interface -- whether thats the user interface, some cross-application interface, the interface of the different parts of one program, or different processes of one function. Programming is going about and implementing that design. I consider it to be more about knowing a skillset than about creativity, its the most tedious and boring part of making a piece of software.

     

    I'm not completely sure where I fall on this. Coding seems like writing a snip-it, when I see coding, I think Coding Horror.

    As far as how I think how design and programming fit together, I feel that design is when someone else does that part. IMHO, when you are a one man show, it's all programming.

    -Josh

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    Accepting the fact that the ever complex Visual Studio, .Net framework, WPF, etc. is the best Microsoft (and the rest of the world) has to offer for writing compelling yet cost effective apps. Hey at least we're super-de-duper strongly typed!

    And... working with people who re-write everything in the most overcomplex, academic way because someday you are gonna need to that way -- you know just in case you decide to replace x with y -- and yet never seem to get anything done. I'm all for seperation of concerns and each layer performing a specific role but sometimes people get too carried away -- especially those who suffer from the "not invented here" syndrome. 

    You know this post has inspired me... I think I'm gonna start a new blog named "Breast Practices" where I mix some common sense programming techniques with some mouth watering pr0n.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    @DeathByVisualStudio: I would like to subscribe to your newsletter...

    Seriously, though, I get your point about overcomplication.  Stuff like NInject and MSFT's Unity are useful tools if you need to unit test parts of the application, so I do understand their usefulness, but I've seen them seriously overused on projects.

    Oh, and another 'hardest part' is coming in to a project after a number of 'clever' folks have had their way with the design and chose not to document what that design was.  Spending a few months feeling like an idiot while you try to wrap  your brain around their 'clever' coding is a giant suckfest.

  • User profile image
    CplCarrot

    Realising that just because you can does NOT mean you must! 

  • User profile image
    Heywood_J

    Getting square pegs into round holes

  • User profile image
    Richard.Hein

    Working without requirements.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    The hardest part of programming is debugging.

  • User profile image
    earnshaw

    Without using a OUIJA board, trying to divine your predecessor's intent when he wrote that glop.  Also, trying not to become violently ill when confronted with what passes for "documentation."

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , ScanIAm wrote

    @DeathByVisualStudio: I would like to subscribe to your newsletter...

    Seriously, though, I get your point about overcomplication.  Stuff like NInject and MSFT's Unity are useful tools if you need to unit test parts of the application, so I do understand their usefulness, but I've seen them seriously overused on projects.

    Ah yes. I spent a week ripping out the enterprise library where somone decided to use it for the factory pattern, despite there only being one type of each class in each factory. *cry*

    But yea, for me YAGNI is a constant problem.

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.