Coffeehouse Thread

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The price of Visual Studio Ultimate

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  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    I just idly checked the price of VS 2010 Ultimate with MSDN on Amazon and I'm still in shock -- it's costs more that I just paid for my car.

    Does anyone here actually have VS Ultimate, and if so how did you pay for it?  Did you pay full price, or was there some offer/deal you used?

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    Maddus Mattus

    €0,-

    It is part of the gold partnership benefits we have at my company.

    And that's why I have exams tommorow, to make sure we keep the status so I get to keep my copy of VS Ultimate Wink

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    , Dr Herbie wrote

     it's costs more that I just paid for my car.

    If you add up how much you will pay over 25 years you could buy a house for that money

     

  • User profile image
    harlock123

    We buy our MSDN membership every year along with software assurance for the rest of our stuff and servers. Its very pricey. We are a small firm with less than 50 employees so the nut seems especially large... Of course the upkeep price is not as much as a new subscription. Sort of locks you in to keeping it updated and not letting that subscription lapse, which is I am guessing no accident. 

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    I dunno. I thought it would be in Microsoft's best interest to make the tools cheap as chips.

     

  • User profile image
    SimonJ

    Where possible buy your Microsoft software on volume licensing with software assurance.

    The Open Value licence allows you to spread the cost over three years and from year 4 onwards you only pay the SA cost (usually less than half the licence + SA cost) and again spread it over three years.

    Smaller, regular known costs are much better than having to suddenly fork out large amounts to get the latest version or getting left behind because you can't afford the next version.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    @Dr Herbie:http://www.amazon.com/Visual-Studio-2010-Ultimate-MSDN/dp/B0038KNER0/ref=sr_1_2?s=software&ie=UTF8&qid=1332941261&sr=1-2

    That's a cheap car. Wink

    We found a great deal on VS2010 Pro with MSDN here. It cost us about $500/seat.

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    @spivonious: Change the $ for a £ and that's about the UK price -- I paid £8000 for my car and I don't consider that cheap!

    Herbie

     

    EDIT : Using today's exchange rate, the UK price (on Amazon) is $17,071.09.  How much does a car cost in the US?

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    Remember that Ultimate has things like Virtual Environment Setup and Tear Down, Load Testing, etc. It's more than just another Visual Studio. I'm sure if you have a group of a dozen developers, you'd only have one person with Ultimate, maybe two.

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    @Harlequin: I'm not contesting the content, just the dramatic price jump from other SKUs (I was expecting £3K max).

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    On the one hand, Ultimate is supposed to be geared for enterprises, who can afford the cost. It's feature set is supposed to include things you simply have no use for as a single developer or even in a small developer group. Heck, we're a fair sized company writing very large applications that have code that ranges from low level drivers to very large WPF UIs, and we don't use Ultimate.

    On the other hand, Microsoft as usual manages to choose certain things to put in higher end SKUs that should exist in much lower end SKUs. You have to have Ultimate to get IntelliTrace? Wha?!?!!

  • User profile image
    ryanb

    , Dr Herbie wrote

    @spivonious: Change the $ for a £ and that's about the UK price -- I paid £8000 for my car and I don't consider that cheap!

    Herbie

     

    EDIT : Using today's exchange rate, the UK price (on Amazon) is $17,071.09.  How much does a car cost in the US?

    Average price these days is about $30,000-32,000.  The cheapest new car you could get is more like 13-15K.

  • User profile image
    BitFlipper

    I'm lucky in that I have an MSDN subscription with my company that includes VS Ultimate. I can tell you that some of the features have been a lifesaver for me.

    Just the other day I was supposed to track down a performance issue in our code. I thought it was going to be a long and painful process. I fired up the profiler wizard and a few second later my app ran and I went through the motions of interacting with it. When I closed it the profiler showed a detailed graph and the hot paths in the code. It showed that a sorting algorithm was taking the vast majority of time. It was obvious how to fix it - simply disable the sorting until all items were added to the tree. The whole thing took me less than 10 minutes to figure out.

    I'm not sure how that justifies the much higher price since stuff like that doesn't happen too often, but it is good to know I have the ability to use these tools when I need them.

     

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    , Dr Herbie wrote

    @spivonious: Change the $ for a £ and that's about the UK price -- I paid £8000 for my car and I don't consider that cheap!

    Herbie

     

    EDIT : Using today's exchange rate, the UK price (on Amazon) is $17,071.09.  How much does a car cost in the US?

    $17k would get you a mid-level trim Ford Focus. But that's not how exchange rates work. I can get a cheeseburger at McDonalds for about $1. Does it cost 64p in the UK?

  • User profile image
    Bass

    The crazy thing is you aren't even getting anything that is really tangible. I don't think we have the manufacturing to give everyone in the world a car, but software? The whole world could have access to all the world's software if the legal system would allow it.

    And if Microsoft wanted to they could give the whole world a MSDN Subscription. So it's artificial scarcity. And I really hate the whole idea of artificial scarcity. I understand the business reasons for it, but it's something that just doesn't feel right and I could never fully get behind as a good model for production.

     

  • User profile image
    BitFlipper

    @Bass:

    Well first of all, no-one owes anyone anything, and no-one is entitled to get anything for free.

    Having said that, selling software is a win-win proposition. The seller of the software is getting money for work they have done, and the buyer has decided that the software they are getting is worth more than the money it costs. That is the key - the buyer is also winning because they get something that is worth more to them than the money they paid for it. If it wasn't, they won't buy it.

    Those that decide the software is not worth the money, have absolutely no right to it, no matter how many times they tell themselves it isn't something tangible. It might not be a physical thing, but it represents work that has been performed by someone to get all the bits lined up so nicely that it actually does something worthwhile.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    As I said, I don't like the idea of artificial scarcity. Nor do I like the idea of product editions that effectively amount to taking some already made complete edition of something and making it increasingly more defective by design.

    It may seem like win-win, but there are people here not using Ultimate Edition, even though it could make them more productive. Microsoft is not making any additional money and these people are worse off anyway. This is lose-lose. Because of the cost and licensing restrictions of Ultimate Edition, there are less "copies" of it around the world than there could be.

    From a macroeconomic sense scarcity is a bad thing, something we try to eliminate as much of. When goods are scarce, there is less of them to go around for everyone. For instance, if oil is scarce, prices of objects made with oil go up, people must drive less or have less net wealth. Wealth is provision of resources, so when the scarcity is global, this causes less net "wealth" in the world.

    Of course you can trivially live outside this system of artificial scarcity as hundreds of millions of "pirates" do, and effectively get access to all the world's knowledge and culture with no limits. But that as we all know is illegal.

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    If you think that is expensive you must have never used Vxworks.  Try 10k $ a year and yes when it expires you cannot compile anymore.   Microsoft has always been cheap.   If you cannot afford Ultimate try a cheaper version.   Microsoft has never priced themselves out of a market.

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