Coffeehouse Thread

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What os does Securifi Almond run?

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  • User profile image
    giovanni

    Does anyone know? I am curious because it looks so Metro (pardon, Modern)...

  • User profile image
    Bass

    Linux 2.6.30 (it's in the specs)

    No idea what the userspace looks like though. Possibly a lot of custom stuff for the UI.

    Looks pretty awesome though. Never heard about it before, I'll have to keep it in mind whenever I decide to smartify my house.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    It's definitely Linux, but you're right. It does have a striking resemblance to the whole Metro / Windows apps UI:

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  • User profile image
    giovanni

    @Bass: Thank you, somehow I missed the specs.

    The product looks interesting. I have read some mixed reviews about the antennas and some quirks of the software and interface, but there is no reason it will not improve in the future.

    I find it interesting that the people who developed it decided to work with Linux even if they had to do some heavy customization for the UI and did not go with some flavor of Windows Embedded (though the latest incarnations of Windows Embedded date of after the product was released). I think Windows Embedded (compact or other) needs to find a way to appeal to hardware developers which I feel prefer the openness of Linux for such projects. Eventually the work on the UI must have been less than the work on the rest of the OS.

  • User profile image
    fanbaby

    Dear giovanni, 

    Thank you for drawing our attention to this small time manufacturer. It seems that we just happened to miss getting them under our generous patent wing. As a thank you note, giovanny, we might use the money we'll surly get from them to improve this forum.

     

    Yours and every computing company,

    Microsoft patent protection plan.

    Don't ask how I got that

    So it does not matter if they use Windows embedded or not Wink

    Any geek who does not speak up against these actions is of the lowest class of geeks, below untouchables {if it comforts you also some Apple fanbys are there too}

    BTW: Don't bother replying with "everyone does this", I've never dignified that with an answer, will not start now.

  • User profile image
    giovanni

    @fanbaby: As always, thank you for your contribution, it contributes immensely to the discussion... Sad

  • User profile image
    RLO

    @giovanni:I agree that it would be interesting to see more hardware developers use WinEmbed, but the problem is the hoops you have to go through to get it.

    With a PC, go and buy an OEM copy of windows at your favorite outlet.

    With embedded, go to http://www.microsoft.com/windowsembedded/en-us/intelligent-systems.aspx

    Then, click and decide the device, then try to find a partner, then try to find a partner with information such as pricing.....or you could just use Linux.

     

  • User profile image
    giovanni

    @RLO: +1

    Indeed, and I find it a pity.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , RLO wrote

    @giovanni:I agree that it would be interesting to see more hardware developers use WinEmbed, but the problem is the hoops you have to go through to get it.

    Hopefully this will all be simpler once Windows Embedded, CE and 8 all converge. You'll just take your ISO of Windows and put it straight on your device.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    , RLO wrote

    @giovanni:I agree that it would be interesting to see more hardware developers use WinEmbed, but the problem is the hoops you have to go through to get it.

    With a PC, go and buy an OEM copy of windows at your favorite outlet.

    With embedded, go to http://www.microsoft.com/windowsembedded/en-us/intelligent-systems.aspx

    Then, click and decide the device, then try to find a partner, then try to find a partner with information such as pricing.....or you could just use Linux.

    There is also a whole bunch of mature routing software free for the taking that runs really well on Linux. The UI is custom but somehow I highly doubt the routing stack is custom because there is no reason for it to be.

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    I'm guessing licensing cost has at least a little to do with it. That and you can pretty much download a fully functional Linux router implementation as is. That leaves adding basic graphics support for some tappable rectangles using one of the many mobile UI toolkits available.

    What would Windows actually get you on a device like this? It's not like they would have used the real start screen, or run WinRT apps on it.

  • User profile image
    giovanni

    @DCMonkey: I think it comes down to the "best" developer experience. If making the UI is easier than writing the routing stack, then this makes sense. However, this is also where Windows could make the biggest difference: make the bits and pieces easier to put together and make them reliable.

  • User profile image
    cheong

    @RLO:If you have MSDN subscription, you can go to MSDN downloads to find it.

    The latest is Windows Embedded Compact 2013 (x86 and x64) DVD ISO - 2060MB in size download. Currently WES 7/8 are available too. You can even get the Image Builder Wizard there.

    Once you worked your build I think you can contact the MS regional sales representatives to see where you can get the license for redistribution.

    Recent Achievement unlocked: Code Avenger Tier 4/6: You see dead program. A lot!
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  • User profile image
    figuerres

    , Bass wrote

    *snip*

    There is also a whole bunch of mature routing software free for the taking that runs really well on Linux. The UI is custom but somehow I highly doubt the routing stack is custom because there is no reason for it to be.

    Well this is one place where I am totally for using Linux, you can make all kinds of great firewall / router gear from Linux, it's really easy, there are a bunch of good tools and distros to pick from.

    years back when the custom boxes were not easy to get and things were not as polished I used to grab an old PC stick 3 Ethernet cards in it and install redhat and then customize the setup and turn off a bunch of stuff. Back then I used a couple of remote tools to manage the box one was a program called "FirewallBuilder" that saved an XML file to describe the firewall and routing rules that it used to generate a shell script with the final commands.   it had a good UI and did a good job with checking the rules for errors for the user.

    that was a while back....

  • User profile image
    Bass

    , figuerres wrote

    *snip*

    Well this is one place where I am totally for using Linux, you can make all kinds of great firewall / router gear from Linux, it's really easy, there are a bunch of good tools and distros to pick from.

    years back when the custom boxes were not easy to get and things were not as polished I used to grab an old PC stick 3 Ethernet cards in it and install redhat and then customize the setup and turn off a bunch of stuff. Back then I used a couple of remote tools to manage the box one was a program called "FirewallBuilder" that saved an XML file to describe the firewall and routing rules that it used to generate a shell script with the final commands.   it had a good UI and did a good job with checking the rules for errors for the user.

    that was a while back....

    Yeah I'm pretty much the same. Except I also use Linux on servers, desktops, mobile phones, tablets, and other stuff like that. Smiley

  • User profile image
    Blue Ink

    @figuerres: some Linux distros are amazingly light, but I still wonder if you really need an OS (any OS) for a highly specialized device. I understand that it's convenient to have the full network stack already implemented, but it still feels like a waste of resources, and the same goes for having a UI... how often do people change their wireless network settings anyway?

  • User profile image
    Bass

    , Blue Ink wrote

    @figuerres: some Linux distros are amazingly light, but I still wonder if you really need an OS (any OS) for a highly specialized device. I understand that it's convenient to have the full network stack already implemented, but it still feels like a waste of resources, and the same goes for having a UI... how often do people change their wireless network settings anyway?

    What is your definition of "highly specialized device"?

  • User profile image
    giovanni

    , Bass wrote

    *snip*

    What is your definition of "highly specialized device"?

    To be more generic, what is the definition of an OS. It is pretty fuzzy to me...

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