Coffeehouse Thread

18 posts

Where are the 7 inch Windows 8 tablets?

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  • Ian2

    Anyone know if there are any manufacturers preparing a 7" Windows 8 tablet?

     

  • Bas

    Last I heard, Blue is supposed to have smaller screen support (not sure why that's necessary) and manufacturers are waiting for that. Wether this is true is, of course, up for debate.

  • spivonious

    I'd love to see this. Give some alternative to the Kindle Fire/Nook HD/iPad Mini/Nexus 7. My wife's grandfather got a Nook HD, and it is terribly slow and hard to use.

    Weren't there rumors of a 7" Surface a few months back?

  • Craig_​Matthews

    Definitely interested in this if the price is right. I want a 7" tablet and there's no way in hell I'm buying anything Android based because I don't like UI lag. Every time I use anything Android based, I think 'yup, this sure as hell is Linux" what with the crappy response to touch gestures.

  • Bass

    @Craig_Matthews:

    That has to do with Android's UI/threading model more than anything else. (Eg: in iOS, UI updates preempt all other threads. Which is not the case in Android. So UI updates can seem more sluggish, especially if there is a lot of stuff going on in the background).

  • kettch

    7" or a little larger if somebody can break out of the pack and decide to go 4:3. Snap View totally rocks on a Surface size device, but on something smaller I could live without it in exchange for a better form factor for reading documents.

  • cbae

    @kettch: A device with 7" display will get unwieldy for one-handed use for a lot of people if the aspect ratio is 4:3. 16:10 or even the weird 3:2 of the Chrome Pixel would be better than 4:3.

  • Craig_​Matthews

    , Bass wrote

    @Craig_Matthews:

    That has to do with Android's UI/threading model more than anything else. (Eg: in iOS, UI updates preempt all other threads. Which is not the case in Android. So UI updates can seem more sluggish, especially if there is a lot of stuff going on in the background).

    I think the best out of the pack are the Samsung Galaxy devices (although, funnily, not the original Galaxy tab), as they seem to me to be the "least laggy" but it's still noticeable -- at least to me -- some say I'm too sensitive to those kinds of things though -shrug- Big Smile

    edit: corrected stupid spelling mistake.

  • kettch

    @cbae: Personally, I don't care about one handed use. I've held an iPad Mini, and that's a good size for what I have in mind. Below a certain size I think 4:3 works because it's a better form factor for books and documents. I'm definitely not interested in 7" widescreen movies.

  • Ian2

    I recently got an Asus VivoTab Smart and I have to say that I am loving it.  Conscious that I am still in the 'honeymoon phase' but when I discovered that it was as powerful as my old PDC Tablet - that put it in a different light.  It really is possible to develop Phone and 8 apps with it in a coffee shop - and the thing is so small & light (lighter than an iPad, smaller than a Surface!).  Shame it only has 2GB RAM but I have to say that hasn't really been anything like as much of a limitation as you might have thought!

    I am enamoured!

  • cbae

    @Ian2: I think the 2GB RAM limitation is due to the Atom processor. Otherwise, no OEM would pass at the opportunity to sell another SKU for $100 more.

  • Ian2

    @cbae: That's a shame, but as I say, surprisingly, hasn't proved to be as much of an issue as you might think.

  • Harlequin

    I just don't see the point in "tablets" that small. Phones are starting to creep past 5 inches already. I'm hoping to grab the Surface Pro this Friday, and this will be the smallest I would ever go for a tablet PC form factor. Maybe if I were to go smaller it would be a Kindle or something for reading...

  • Ian2

    @Harlequin:Yes, but world of difference price wise between the Asus and the Surface Pro - screen dimensions are the same but the Asus is smaller and lighter and the keyboard / convert to laptop / battery life is also in its' favour.  But yes, wish I was picking up a Pro on Friday as well!

  • Craig_​Matthews

    , Harlequin wrote

    I just don't see the point in "tablets" that small. Phones are starting to creep past 5 inches already. I'm hoping to grab the Surface Pro this Friday, and this will be the smallest I would ever go for a tablet PC form factor. Maybe if I were to go smaller it would be a Kindle or something for reading...

    I think putting quotes around 'tablets' was really the way to go, actually. I think at this point, what we call these things is slightly a bit off anyway. We're trying to call something which does more than make phone calls a phone by throwing the word 'smart' in front of it to make 'smartphone' -- and calling anything bigger a tablet, but now we have the form factors meeting up somewhere in the middle around 5-7". It's really all the same thing now except for one little thing -- the one thing that's left, other than size (which IMO is meaningless now), that really distinguishes a "phone" from a "tablet" --- the appearance of a line item on your bill that says "voice." 

    What happens when we're all using Skype/Facetime/VoIP for all of our calls? Moving toward that trend, at some point, when we're all using VoIP to make a regular calls, the one remaining vestige of "voice service" will probably be the ability to make a reliable and instantly traceable 911 call. It won't be called voice service anymore since we'll all be using VoIP for our calls, we'd only be using their "voice" service for emergency services. So it'll end up being called "emergency services" on our bill.

    So at that point, will we distinguish between a "phone" and a "tablet" based on whether you can call 911 on it?

    I think we should just call them all PDAs with different sizes for different purposes, small, medium, large, grande, venti, whatever.

  • Bas

    @Craig_Matthews: absolutely. In fact, that's why I think people who go "Smartphones should make phonecalls and the rest is extra" are missing the point. It's only called a smartphone for historic reasons. It's a computer that happens to also make calls. One could argue that a smartphone should be a pc, and the ability to make phonecalls is extra.

  • Sven Groot

    , Craig_​Matthews wrote

    I think we should just call them all PDAs with different sizes for different purposes, small, medium, large, grande, venti, whatever.

    I think we should call them PADDs. Because, you know, I'm a huge nerd. Wink

  • Blue Ink

    , Craig_​Matthews wrote

    *snip*

    I think putting quotes around 'tablets' was really the way to go, actually. I think at this point, what we call these things is slightly a bit off anyway. We're trying to call something which does more than make phone calls a phone by throwing the word 'smart' in front of it to make 'smartphone' -- and calling anything bigger a tablet, but now we have the form factors meeting up somewhere in the middle around 5-7". It's really all the same thing now except for one little thing -- the one thing that's left, other than size (which IMO is meaningless now), that really distinguishes a "phone" from a "tablet" --- the appearance of a line item on your bill that says "voice." 

    What happens when we're all using Skype/Facetime/VoIP for all of our calls? Moving toward that trend, at some point, when we're all using VoIP to make a regular calls, the one remaining vestige of "voice service" will probably be the ability to make a reliable and instantly traceable 911 call. It won't be called voice service anymore since we'll all be using VoIP for our calls, we'd only be using their "voice" service for emergency services. So it'll end up being called "emergency services" on our bill.

    So at that point, will we distinguish between a "phone" and a "tablet" based on whether you can call 911 on it?

    I think we should just call them all PDAs with different sizes for different purposes, small, medium, large, grande, venti, whatever.

    Personally, I don't care about the items on my bill: I draw the line between devices I can use like a handset and devices that are too large for that. Devices in the first category are "phones" everything else isn't.

    The reason why I think the distinction makes sense is that there are too many use cases where a "phone" is the best solution, either because of privacy, convenience or social acceptance. Just to make an example, video calling has been around for a long time now, and yet I don't think I've ever seen it used in the wild. Things may change in a generation or two, but for the time being there's still a place for devices that are mainly phones and can occasionally make do for other stuff.

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