Coffeehouse Thread

13 posts

Will the need to buy new apps hurt Microsoft Surface?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    Heywood_J

    From what I've seen about Surface so far it looks pretty nice and I might actually want to buy one.  However this article raises an interesting point.

    http://www.zdnet.com/ecosystem-lock-in-may-just-break-the-surface-7000000421/

    If you own an iPhone or Android phone what tablet do you buy?

    If you have an iPhone and then buy an iPad, most of your iPhone apps will run on the iPad.  If you have an Android phone and then buy and Android tablet, most of your phone apps will run on the tablet.

    If you buy a Surface, you have to buy all new apps.  Since I have neither (iPhone or Android) it doesn't affect me, but many people do (they are the two biggest market share of phones).  Will people want to do this?

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    This is down to the developers. If you paid for angry birds on the iPhone, they might let you have the Win8 version for free. That's not really Microsoft's call though.

  • User profile image
    01001001

    @Heywood_J:

    I want to chime in and say that iPhone apps on the iPad look like pixelated sh1t when upscaled.

    Not saying that has anything to do with buying an iPad as the thread suggests, but it had to be said.

  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    , evildictaitor wrote

    This is down to the developers. If you paid for angry birds on the iPhone, they might let you have the Win8 version for free. That's not really Microsoft's call though.

    How would you implement such a scheme though? Unless the appstore creators come up with some kind of unified login. (Since Rovio don't know that Joe on WP7/8/Win8 is the same Joe that bought Angry Birds on on iOS.)

     

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    , evildictaitor wrote

    This is down to the developers. If you paid for angry birds on the iPhone, they might let you have the Win8 version for free. That's not really Microsoft's call though.

    While that may help the user make the decision it certainly still the user's call. If it's still too much of a pain to integrate heterogeneous devices then people will happily stay locked-in. Microsoft is late to the tablet game (and the phone game before it) -- their call. That's going to make an investment in the WindowsRT tablets difficult unless some shims like BlueStacks will let them bring their investment in other ecosystems with them.

    The days of eco-system lock-in are upon us...

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    I think Surface has the potential to have it's own set of killer-apps, at least for the Pro, since it will likely have a much more powerful processor than it's non-windows counterparts.

    Something like Mathematica would be awesome.

    -Josh

  • User profile image
    dentaku

    @JoshRoss:Many people, including myself, will be perfectly comfortable buying a Windows 8 Pro tablet but I can see how it might stop someone from buying a Windows RT tablet.

    I'm thinking it will take Intel Win8 tablets becoming popular because they're a good alternative to ultrabooks and in turn growing the marketplace for Metro apps FIRST before people consider spending money on the less flexible Windows RT tablets. Before there are lots of apps, an ARM based Windows RT tablet will be pretty much just a mobile web browser/ebook/media player gadget.

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    , dentaku wrote

    Before there are lots of apps, an ARM based Windows RT tablet will be pretty much just a mobile web browser/ebook/media player gadget.

    But if it is the best product on the market for this and the price is reasonable then it should command respectable sales just on this basis alone.  Compelling Apps then adding weight and momentum to sales going forward.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    @Ian2: I'd argue that it could be advantageous to MS to really keep the price low on the ARM Surface, maybe even make it a loss leader.

    Getting the surface into the hands of many will compell developers to write apps for it, and this will in turn drive sales of Surface and app store sales.

    For the Surface Pro this is less of a problem, as it already has a strong value proposition by being a hybrid laptop/tablet done right.

  • User profile image
    fanbaby

    @JoshRoss: What in your opinion prevents a grand online 'mathmatica'. I think the time is ripe, and hope it's gonna be an open platform. We need the wikipedia of math s/w (many open pieces exsist, and there is even a project to unifiy them, but i think they lack a certain polish).

  • User profile image
    Proton2

    , fanbaby wrote

    @JoshRoss: What in your opinion prevents a grand online 'mathmatica'. I think the time is ripe, and hope it's gonna be an open platform. We need the wikipedia of math s/w (many open pieces exsist, and there is even a project to unifiy them, but i think they lack a certain polish).

    Already done:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sage_(mathematics_software)

    I ran SAGE in a virtual machine running Linux and interfacing from a web browser. I didn't really use it though, just got it up and running to see if it would work and to test it.

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    Ignoring the fact that the Pro version allows you to run all of your windows applications...

    "Apps" generally come in two prices: free and $0.99. Yes, some are more expensive, but it's the rare "app" in deed that surpasses the $10 price and the vast majority are under $5. If the prospect of having to buy "all new apps" at these prices is a deal breaker, maybe one should consider long and hard whether such a device is worth the money no matter who puts their logo on it.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    I've had my WP7 for 7 months now, and I have yet to buy an app. There are so many free ones that I don't see the point. I'd rather see ads than pay $1. Yes, I'm cheap.

    I imagine it will be the same with Windows RT. I think the most popular ones will be free and make their money off of ad revenue.

    With that said, I don't think people would be upset if they had to spend another $5 to get their favorite game on Windows RT. For most people, $5 is a total impulse amount. They won't even hesitate before clicking Buy.

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.