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Windows 8's PR problem...

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  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    , evildictaitor wrote

    Seems like a lot of people actually quite like Win8 :/

    I'm just reacting to this fraudulent statement that was based on your search results "indications".

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • User profile image
    elmer

    @spivonious: "But without the Start Screen, I don't think Windows 8 offers enough on the surface to cause users to want to upgrade"

    "Upgrades" are not really an issue. The issue is new hardware purchases over the next 3-5 years, and how the software will influence buyers' choices.

    Buyers of tablets will hopefully be attracted by the Metro UI, as it's well suited to it.

    Buyers of laptops/desktops, not so much, and by not providing the option for maintaining the current UI, as the default UI, MS are giving buyers justification to consider alteratives, such as a Mac.

    Having suffered the Vista backlash, I just can't understand why MS would cut their own throat by not allowing people to remove such an obvious barrier to sales, and allow laptop/desktop buyers to choose their default UI - Metro or Classic. The only thing I can put it down to, is some huge egos getting in the way.

  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    I just asked cleverbot what it thinks about Windows 8. It tells me, "I don't think I could take it to work with me." While not scientific or even logical, I think that, with enough prying, we can get to the bottom of this.

    -Josh

  • User profile image
    Charles

    We need more love around here....

    C

  • User profile image
    contextfree`

    Having suffered the Vista backlash, I just can't understand why MS would cut their own throat by not allowing people to remove such an obvious barrier to sales, and allow laptop/desktop buyers to choose their default UI - Metro or Classic. The only thing I can put it down to, is some huge egos getting in the way.

    Wouldn't experience with the Vista backlash (and Win7 success) actually reinforce that rolling back to the previous version (or providing an option to do so) isn't necessarily the way to approach situations like this? Win7 mostly didn't roll anything back from Vista to XP. It kept the Vista start menu, Vista Explorer, Vista Control Panel, Vista visual theme, Vista driver and security models etc. The changes it did make, like the taskbar, were about moving forward to something new, not rolling back to XP. 

    Even if there is a backlash to Win8 I would hope that Win9 is about solving whatever problems people have in new ways, not rolling back to the Win7 approach.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    Yeah anyway if Win8 is a colossal failure, it means Win7 will be a colossal success for years to come. Similar to Vista/XP. Microsoft can afford to take risks like this.

    Why should Microsoft care, they get the same license fee anyway. Oh no you are buying a slightly older version of Windows from us that still has like 90 years of copyright left on it, what ever shall we do.

    Let's be honest here, there isn't going to be some mass migration of people to Linux over this. If anything a mass "migration" (or "stay in place") to Windows 7.

  • User profile image
    elmer

    @Bass:I'll be surprised if MS allow OEMs to pre-load Win7 on new hardware, once Win8 is released. This is a mistake they made with Vista, and it suppressed the Vista sales figures. They will want Win8 to appear as successful as possible, even if the sales numbers are not reflective of installed O/S numbers.

    Business buyers (Win8-Pro etc) will have the option of downgrading ofter purchase, to Win7.

    Consumers however, will either have to accept any compromises, or consider alternatives, such as Mac.

  • User profile image
    Escamillo

    , figuerres wrote

    I think the windows 8 / metro / startmenu thing is like the windows media center but in reverse.

    Microsoft said more or less "not many folks use media center the stats show us this fact" but in the last 2 versions of WMC very little has been done to promote it.  it's a "Hidden feature" that i bet 70-90 % of users have never even seen and even if they have seen it very few of them have a cable card slot to get use of one of the key features .. or a tuner card for that matter. so now it's going to be an addon for windows 8.

    I rather suspect that the folks at MS have a fear that if they did not push metro it would not take off and go mainstream and wind up like WMC soon down the road.

    so they "bet the farm" on it.

    problem is that for a can't even begin to count how many users  the new metro start screen will be a deal breaker as it stands now with forcing it on users.

    IMHO they should have just done two versions of windows and let folks pick the one they want.

    if metro and the tablet are as great as they think they are the market would show this with the sales numbers....   that's a really good "stat" to go by.

    there are problems with the two versions idea yes, but I see problems with the "all in one" method also.

    I disagree with your conclusion and I think your conclusion contradicts the first portion of your comment.

    I look at the Office Ribbon.  I think (as does Microsoft) that the ribbon UI is hands-down superior to the old Office UI,  But if Microsoft had given folks the option of turning off the ribbon so they could use the old UI instead (an option that many folks demanded before Office2k7 RTMed), then lots of folks would've chosen to stay with the old Office UI, not because it's better than the new ribbon UI, but out of force of habit or fear of change.  "Letting the market decide" by allowing an option to turn off the ribbon would've been stupid, because the inferior UI might've won out based on habit and/or fear.  So Office would be stuck with the old UI forevermore.

     It would've been very sad for Microsoft to spend lots of time and money on developing the Office Ribbon, then get scared and offer users the ability to use the old menu-based UI, and see everyone pick the old UI out of habit or fear, so that the clearly better ribbon UI fades into oblivion, never being given a true chance to gain traction.

     No.  If a developer thinks they've come up with a better way than their old way, then they should push it.  And shove it down the user's throat if necessary.  A developer shouldn't even give what he thinks is the inferior option a chance to win based on habit or fear of change.  (Now, if a developer can offer multiple options and he doesn't feel that any of them are significantly better, then sure, offer all of those options to the user; but if the developer truly believes one of the options is clearly better, then he should go with it and remove the other options.)

     

  • User profile image
    Escamillo

    , evildictaitor wrote

    I think the problem (once again) is that Microsoft made the mistake of telling people what it was doing, rather than just releasing it and getting a pile of celebrities and adverts to say "wow - now my desktop is swooshy! Why have an iPad 3 when you can have a Windows 8".

    /snip

    I kind of agree, but then again, there are folks complaining that Microsoft is being too secretive wrt Windows 8.  Anyway, Microsoft wants Metro apps to be ready when Windows 8 is released, so they have to release something before the actual release.  They could release it just to devs, I guess, but it would leak, so what would be the point?  Second, Microsoft does want feedback and they've made alterations based on user feedback (feedback that isn't of the , "What you're doing is totally wrong" variety).  And they need the feedback to get bug reports.  Unlike Apple, Microsoft doesn't control the hardware; they need to run the OS on many, many hardware configurations, of which they control none.  Apple needs their OS to run on 6 or so hardware configurations, all of which they control.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    I don't think it has a PR problem. Outside of the very IT-focused environments the press coverage I've seen has been exceptionally positive and particularly of the Metro UI. I think occasionally IT folks get a little over caught up in the echo chamber we've created and how it over amplifies opinions that are particularly extreme in one way or the other.

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    , AndyC wrote

    I don't think it has a PR problem. Outside of the very IT-focused environments the press coverage I've seen has been exceptionally positive and particularly of the Metro UI. I think occasionally IT folks get a little over caught up in the echo chamber we've created and how it over amplifies opinions that are particularly extreme in one way or the other.

    Andy I mean no disrespect but I can't find much coverage that is exceptionally positive and particularly of the Metro UI. What do find are a lot of neutral reviews of Windows 8 that raise a lot of questions. I'm a news junky and read and watch more than my fair share of news in and out of the technical realm. In fact my favorite magazine to read in the WC is Oprah's "O" magazine (really helps you understand the female being better). I'm not saying I qualify as scientific evidence to the contrary of your point but am scratching my head here wondering how you came upon yours.

    The only enthusiastic reports I've read were from device manufacturers looking forward to building Apollo (W8) based devices. While that's some good news it doesn't equate to WP's (or W8) success in the marketplace.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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