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Windows Phone Apps to run on Windows 8?

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  • User profile image
    Ian2

    The CEO of NVIDIA thinks so:

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-20102167-94/nvidia-ceo-sees-tenfold-growth-in-mobile-chip-biz/

    I suspect there might be some nifty footwork involving Jupiter but with many Apps using one of the Panoramic style interfaces the difference in form factor might not be that much of a problem ...

    30,000+ Apps would be a nice start for a new Arm based tablet platform and would certainly give a boost to existing wp7 developers. 

    And then there's HTML5 ...  Hmmmmmmm.

  • User profile image
    KDawg

    The problem is that all WP7 apps are 800x480 and never run/tested on anything else.  I guess they can pop up a 800x480 window to run the apps in, but that doesn't seem ideal. 

     

    If MS would have just specified an aspect ratio and a minimum screen resolution (800x480 being the minimum) that would have been a lot better, IMO.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    Yeah, I doubt we'll see this. Like KDawg said, WP7 apps are designed to fit in those resolutions, be it 800x480 ad/or 480x800. Controls like Panorama and Pivot are for a phone UI. The layout is for a phone...the design, has a phone in mind.

    Look at the Foursquare app:

    Generic Forum Image

    I don't see this working at all on a 1920x1200 screen, both in UI and UX(usability).

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    How about this:

    http://rd3d2.wordpress.com/2011/09/06/windows-phone-apps-on-win8-tablet/

    Personally I would want this kind of app to be 'bigger' on a tablet-  so upsizing  could work quite well?

  • User profile image
    Bas

    Even if you sort of scale up the panoramas and such, all the assets like icons and such would be super low res. It would never work. I could imagine that in future you could write an app that runs both on Windows Phone and Windows 8 (provide high-res assets and they'll get scaled down when compiled for the phone or something), but existing apps? No way.

    I wouldn't be suprised if Windows Phone 8 and its development framework are being specifically designed to work with the whole jupiter/immersive thing though. Maybe he's onto something, but just off by one major version.

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    @Bas:Agreed, though maybe a recompile by devs to Jupiter using higher res assets ...

  • User profile image
    CKurt

    @Ian2: Aren't all the icons vector based these days?

  • User profile image
    KDawg

    @CKurt: No.  In fact most aren't.  PNG and JPG are still the most common icon formats, and neither is vector based. 

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    ,Harlequin wrote

    Yeah, I doubt we'll see this. Like KDawg said, WP7 apps are designed to fit in those resolutions, be it 800x480 ad/or 480x800. Controls like Panorama and Pivot are for a phone UI. The layout is for a phone...the design, has a phone in mind.

    This is the reason I was disappointed the "native" UI widgets and toolkit present in WP7 were entirely re-implemented in Silverlight: by having two different implementations of the same concept it means twice the effort is involved in doing "mind-shifting" work such as allowing WP7 apps to work on a PC, such as (for example) "expanding" the panorama view so all tiles are simultaneously visible. I believe this is the sort of thing Apple might do if they made a platform like this (using their ObjC-based frames throughout, no doubt) but thanks for the Silverlight lock-in (or rather, lock-out from system-provided services) you'll see that things really are constrained when it comes to ensuring applications can take full advantage of future runtime environments.

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    ,W3bbo wrote

    *snip*

    This is the reason I was disappointed the "native" UI widgets and toolkit present in WP7 were entirely re-implemented in Silverlight: by having two different implementations of the same concept it means twice the effort is involved in doing "mind-shifting" work such as allowing WP7 apps to work on a PC, such as (for example) "expanding" the panorama view so all tiles are simultaneously visible. I believe this is the sort of thing Apple might do if they made a platform like this (using their ObjC-based frames throughout, no doubt) but thanks for the Silverlight lock-in (or rather, lock-out from system-provided services) you'll see that things really are constrained when it comes to ensuring applications can take full advantage of future runtime environments.

    What are you talking about? Expressionless

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    I am ok with lower resolution picture in SL. Having the same app on tablet is good for me. They can update the graphics for tablet, but it is not a must for me.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    Minh

    Is it a stretch to imagine WP7 running on a W8 tablet.... just like iPhone apps on an iPad?

    Then there'll be apps written for the higher resolutions... just like iPad versions of said iPhone apps?

    Honestly... I've already figure out Jupiter... Ask me if you have questions

  • User profile image
    Proton2

    I am able to run some Windows Phone 7 apps on my Windows 7 desktop machine. They run in a window that looks an awful lot like a windows phone 7. Wink

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    Interesting opinion on what Win 8 is from Beta News:

    http://betanews.com/2011/09/01/windows-8-has-a-split-personality/

  • User profile image
    CKurt

    @W3bbo: You are saying Silverlight is not implemented in the OS be default? I'm pretty sure it will be in Windows 8 so your point is not completely valid.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    ,CKurt wrote

    @W3bbo: You are saying Silverlight is not implemented in the OS be default? I'm pretty sure it will be in Windows 8 so your point is not completely valid.

    He might be bringing up possible lawsuit stuff. I'd guarantee that if Silverlight is installed by default on Windows 8 that Adobe Air is as well.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    ,CKurt wrote

    @W3bbo: You are saying Silverlight is not implemented in the OS be default? I'm pretty sure it will be in Windows 8 so your point is not completely valid.

    No

    I'm saying:

    • Right now, Windows Phone 7 comes with "native" widgets and controls and frameworks for user-interface development. These are used by some (if not all?) of the native applications that come on the system, such as the Settings area.
      • This includes the "panorama" control, swipe/slide controls, and a few others.
    • Windows Phone 7 applications, on the other hand, have to use controls and widgets developed entirely in/on Silverlight. Silverlight does not provide a thin managed wrapper around the native panorama/etc controls, instead they're entirely re-implemented.
    • As a consequence, if Microsoft wants to make WP7 applications run on desktop Windows in some "enhanced" mode where a panorama view is expanded to show all the areas they would probably make a start by modifying the behaviour of the native controls, but they would alsohave to update how the Silverlight controls work, but this then doubles the amount of work required, as a probable consequence Microsoft will not do this.
      • Therefore if WP7 applications will be enabled to work on desktop Windows, it will be such that they appear as they do in the device emulator (just with a prettier display border). Do not expect anything mind-bend-y.
      • Case in point: early on in WP7's life Microsoft didn't implement the "push" state effect on various Silverlight controls. Developers were annoyed they had to re-implement something that the system should provide itself; many developers did, but couldn't get the effect to look right. Microsoft is free to parameterise the native push effect and make it more prettier in the next release of WP7, but because the Silverlight versions re-implemented it themselves they're stuck with the old look.
    • TL;DR: By making the Silverlight stack use its own re-implementation of controls on WP7 Microsoft hasdoubled the amount of effort involved in making changes to the platform, this will stifle innovation.
  • User profile image
    CKurt

    @W3bbo: Okay , I get what you are saying. Sorry about my previous reply. However:

    The main reason they have the difference in 'native' controls and 'SilverLight' controls on WP7 is because the OS itself and the DEV tools were developed at the same point in time (because if the tight schedule).

    There would be no reason for updating the 'native' controls, why not just only update the SilverLight controls? The only thing they then have to do is reduce the usage of native controls in WP7 and start using the SilverLight ones by default when adding new features to the OS. And I'm thinking they are already doing that.

    Running WP7 applications on Windows 8 would only be a matter of running SilverLight on Windows 8 and interpreting the XAML in a different way if the screen resolution is different (large windows screen). [It might need to be duplicated or recompiled but I'm taking the optimistic side here]

    Running WP7 native hubs/applications on Windows 8 would be harder, but also less appealing to the dev audience and less needed as long as they provide a good way to port SilverLight based applications to Windows 8 (and Xbox360)

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