Coffeehouse Thread

17 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

With all these tablet threads...

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    CaRDiaK

    My $2,600 tablet arrived the other day. Couldn't have come at a better time too with all these exciting changes happening on pretty much every platform right now. Love working in tech B)

    Generic Forum Image

    Bit of geeky fun once I had it setup (Priorities right!?> Tongue Out )

    Generic Forum Image

    Roll on WIN8!

    Lenovo X220Tablet - i5, 8GB, 160G SSD 

    We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    What kind of graphics performance and battery life do you get?

    I used to have a Tecra M4 convertible tablet PC, but I actually prefer having a 'proper' laptop.

    Of note, I saw the Apple MacBook Airs in-person today, I'm very impressed with what they've done.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    @CaRDiaK: Wow, $2600? It's no wonder that Windows tablet PCs never caught on.

  • User profile image
    cbae

    , spivonious wrote

    @CaRDiaK: Wow, $2600? It's no wonder that Windows tablet PCs never caught on.

    That's about what those were going for about a decade ago.

  • User profile image
    CaRDiaK

    It's important to keep in mind this isn't exactly end user spec and its damn bulky too. It's aimed purely at development.

    Fortunately my company pay for my machines so it doesn't matter to me personally what it cost. As long as the business agrees that's all that matters.

    Could have gotten something cheaper but I insisted on the top spec i5, the IPS screen and I'm a complete keyboard * so I specifically requested this model.

    @w3bbo I'm getting 5 hours on the 9 cell battery with constant use. For me that's Office, Videos running, Visual Studio, pretty Impressed to be honest. It was a hard choice between this and the Air. I know your in bed with Apple now but for me, the winning factor was the ability to flip it and use it as a tablet. Now I can develop not only for Win 7 / Win8 but Android too, I have been dabbling more and more with Java lately. I do run gdipp on my machines though Wink Mac's font rendering is super sexy.

    Graphics is 5.9, gaming 6.3 on the experience index. Everything else is 7+, Not overly important to me as I don''t play games, I have a dedicated rig for that (when I eventually get the time to play anything)


    @cbae That's probably correct, but still means nothing to me. I could have gotten one for sub $8000, prob sub $600 if I tried, but this one means I should be set for a good few years to come without a lot of hassle, I'm a fan of software in general, it just so happens my day job is prominently MS, so at least I can keep work and myself happy at the same time with this thing.

    It's just nice not having to manage two machine configs and transfer files to and from work as lately, I have a lot of out of hours work to be doing as well as generally improving my development skills using different frameworks and languages. Was a pain to be honest there is so much out there at the moment. It was heading the way that I'd have two machines and then a tablet to manage at the same time which just wastes time more than anything.

    Now I have the potential / power to do almost anything, for almost everything, all on the same rig. For at least the next couple of years hopefully, which alas, makes my life Simpler! I couldn't ask for anything more than that I don't think... 

    We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    spivonious

    Actually the base X-series from Lenovo isn't too bad at $1150. If the convertible laptops ever get down to Best Buy prices (i.e. $400-$1000) then Windows 8 should have no problems taking off.

  • User profile image
    ManipUni

    As much as I really want a Windows 8 tablet, that just doesn't make economic sense. Should have got a Thinkpad T series.  

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    , W3bbo wrote

    I used to have a Tecra M4 convertible tablet PC, but I actually prefer having a 'proper' laptop.

    Of note, I saw the Apple MacBook Airs in-person today, I'm very impressed with what they've done.

    Conversely I now have a Hp Envy (essentially a Macbook Pro clone) and would dearly love a tablet again as it makes life so much easier. Alas my poor old Dell Latitude XT is falling to bits, the touch digitizer is knackered and the hard drive (with idiotically proprietary and expensive connector) died so I had to go back to the 40Gb one it shipped with, leaving it as little more than a Windows 8 test machine.

    I am dearly hoping that Windows 8 tablets will fall nicely into my price bracket again when they're released and i can go back to lazily lying back and web-surfing in comfort.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    @AndyC:I'm not sure I can wait until 2013...I'm tempted to pick this up:

    http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/latitude-st/pd

    It just got released yesterday, so hopefully it'll last a few years.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    well, nevermind.  Only 2GB, Only win32, and it won't ship until the end of the month.

    Super-duper-no-thanks.

  • User profile image
    cbae

    , ScanIAm wrote

    well, nevermind.  Only 2GB, Only win32, and it won't ship until the end of the month.

    Super-duper-no-thanks.

    The problem with this ridiculous fascination with having ultra thin devices is that you know the gdamn DRAM is soldered onto the motherboard, which makes it impossible to open it up and just add memory like you can on a regular notebook.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    The problem with this ridiculous fascination with having ultra thin devices is that you know the gdamn DRAM is soldered onto the motherboard, which makes it impossible to open it up and just add memory like you can on a regular notebook.

    Ideally, you wouldn't need to. Computer specs don't need to double every 18 months now, my 2004 machine (Athlon64 3200, 2GB RAM) runs Windows 7 fine, and my reclaimed 2005 Dell PowerEdge servers (Dual Xeon 3.2Ghz, 4GB RAM) runs Server 2008R2 and SQL Server faster than my 2008 servers (Dual-core Xeon, 4GB RAM).

    To that end, if you buy a machine with, say, 8GB RAM now, you'll never need to upgrade the RAM at all in its useful life.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    , W3bbo wrote

    *snip*

    To that end, if you buy a machine with, say, 8GB RAM now, you'll never need to upgrade the RAM at all in its useful life.

    640K should be enough for anyone....

  • User profile image
    cbae

    , W3bbo wrote

    *snip*

    Ideally, you wouldn't need to. Computer specs don't need to double every 18 months now, my 2004 machine (Athlon64 3200, 2GB RAM) runs Windows 7 fine, and my reclaimed 2005 Dell PowerEdge servers (Dual Xeon 3.2Ghz, 4GB RAM) runs Server 2008R2 and SQL Server faster than my 2008 servers (Dual-core Xeon, 4GB RAM).

    To that end, if you buy a machine with, say, 8GB RAM now, you'll never need to upgrade the RAM at all in its useful life.

    But with those computers that support removable DRAM, you could have opted for lower than ideal amount of memory if that's all you could have afforded, and then upgrade to the amount of memory that you truly wanted later. You don't have that option with ridiculously thin devices, never mind not even having the option to purchase one with more memory from the outset.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    @W3bbo:I doubled mine to 16

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , AndyC wrote

    *snip*

    640K should be enough for anyone....

    That's not the same thing. 8GB now is "enough" from now, until 4 or 5 years' time. Compare this with the situation from 2004 when 1GB was enough for only 2 or 3 years.

    This is evidenced by the fact it's now been 5 years since 2GB became standard-issue, and yet it's still the default option on a MacBook Air. Mass-market machines had 3GB (the 32-bit Windows limit) for a long period of time, and even now it's not guaranteed that a machine you buy will be 64-bit.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , cbae wrote

    But with those computers that support removable DRAM, you could have opted for lower than ideal amount of memory if that's all you could have afforded, and then upgrade to the amount of memory that you truly wanted later. You don't have that option with ridiculously thin devices, never mind not even having the option to purchase one with more memory from the outset.

    We, the people who tinker, are in the minority. People (the mass-market) don't want a computer they'll have to fiddle around with after they buy it. Technology is getting 'simpler' (thank Apple for that) - besides, RAM is cheap, even at the high-end.

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.