Coffeehouse Thread

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X720 wish.

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    Maddus Mattus

    @Sven Groot:

    I got my instructions from Vendetta

    at 4:00 Wink

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    Minh

    Gah... the C64 was so primative... Incidentally, C64 also comes w/ a brick. On the last .Net Rocks show, they mentioned a DC power supply for your entire house... coming out of plugs. How about that? If you could eliminate the power supply from each of your DC devices... How quiet would that be?

     

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    Maddus Mattus

    @Minh:

    Big plus of having AC, it doesnt matter wich way you plug in Wink

    And AC is much more flexible then DC. You can't transform DC without substantial loss, AC is piece of pie with two coils.

    And how dare you call c64 primitive! Blasphemer!

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    Minh

    @Maddus Mattus,

    The majority of electronics in your house runs on DC. I'm not saying sending DC from the power plant to your house... but how about if there's a DC convert in your basement (or in the street), and have some sort of smart DC coming out your wall?

    You'd eliminate an expensive component from your desktop, and those annoying plugs from every electronic devices.

    And hey! the definition of primative is if this .netduino board has more memory than something, then that something is primative haha

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    Maddus Mattus

    @Minh: Then you would need a cord as thick as the secondairy cord of the XBox power brick for every device that requires DC.

    And what voltages are you going to supply? +75 +50 +25 +15 +12 +6 +5 +3 -75 -50 -25 -15 -12 -6 -5 -3 and GND?

    That's one bad a$$ cable!

    How are you going to fit all that inside your walls?

  • User profile image
    Minh

    @Maddus Mattus,

    We would need to define a new standard for cable and supplied voltage of course. So, let's say 1 connector out of the wall, but different connectors into each device.

    So, a cable that promises to provide power for a PC would provide all the voltages above, and would come w/ an appropriately thick cable.

    A cable the promises just enough voltage to power a printer would be a think cable.

    And to power all the outlets in your house, you'd run cables to all of them that can supply the most voltage required, which is probably a PC.

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    Maddus Mattus

    @Minh:

    Typical power blocks like the one on the XBox are switched power supplies. It would be cheaper to run on coil based power supplies, like the C64 one. But coils are more expensive to make. They cost way more copper.

    Switched power supplies tend to use 5% of each individual AC sine wave (depending on their power output), while the power company will still charge you for 100% of it. Coils don't have this problem, instead of switch, they transform.

    So, when energy prices justify the extra material investment, we will see a phase out of witched power supplies.

    Another big problem, besides the huge wireing problem. is the signal noise problem. High voltages signals have a low signal to noise ratio. Because no noise signal is going to generate spikes that are as big as 220V. But if you take 1.5V for example, let's say you got a 0.5V spike, that's HUGE. Component dead.

    The biggest problem of all is the losses in transporting low voltages. Losses in transport are dependent on current. Low current, low loss, high current, high loss, same as government spending and tax. How do you get low current? Higher voltage. So, if you lower the voltage, you get more current, you get more losses.

    So it's not guaranteed that if you have such a supply in your basement, you cant get 5V in your attic. Maybe 3V or 2V or nothing at all.

    But Maddus, my television signal is digital, that signal doenst loose it's strength over miles.

    Yes, ofcourse, it's not ment to transfer power. So those signals operate with little current, almost nothing. So they are not prone to much energy loss, because there is little energy taken out of the signal.

  • User profile image
    Minh

    @Maddus Mattus,

    We just need to put Apple onto this problem. Ultimately, my motivation for home DC power is aesthetics. And we know Apple can do aesthetics.

     

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    ScanIAm

    A large number of household appliances depend on a standard Hz to function.  Until we're able to make cheap solid-state washing machines, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners, AC has some other advantages.

    I could see adding a 3rd type of line to the house (i.e. 120v/240v/DC ???V) that would provide DC power for electronics and have a limited range of voltages, but perhaps it would be better to do this when solar/wind/home-fusion becomes more ubiquious. 

     

  • User profile image
    cbae

    Can't wait.

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  • User profile image
    Maddus Mattus

    @cbae: i have one of those, its powering my DeLorean.

    Going to pick up Artie in a minute to go and catch a train.

  • User profile image
    Minh

    @ScanIAm,

    I smell a kickstarter project

     

  • User profile image
    Maddus Mattus

    @ScanIAm: that would make seven lines in total;

    L1, L2, L3, N, DC, GND

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    I love the PS3 design in integrating the power supply *inside* the unit, I don't know why XBOX360 couldn't do the same

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    , Ion Todirel wrote

    I love the PS3 design in integrating the power supply *inside* the unit, I don't know why XBOX360 couldn't do the same

    Well, PS3 is kinda BIG. Although I don't mind the size myself, it has tons of impact on general users though.

    I am ok with power brick, it has many benefits (heat, replacement, etc), I just hate the rigid wires. And with power brick, I get even more rigid wires. And place it right next to my desktop, arrrggggg.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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