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XBOX - The summary

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    elmer

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    Blue Ink
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    elmer

    LOL - Ok, but then again, who reads page 5 of a thread? By that time it has usually morphed into nothing even vaguely related to the original topic.

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    ScottWelker

    Hey! Will it do TV?

    Wink

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    wastingtime​withforums

    MS marketing screwed this one up. No doubt about that.

    This video (animated gif) is currently spreading like wildfire in gaming circles:

    http://i.minus.com/iBzvb2JSpQNRM.gif

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    cheong

    Who want to use XBox to play TV content when people plug XBox to TV already?

    Sure, you can use Kinect to change channel or what, but that's not very important to daily TV watching experience.

    That said, someone tell Microsoft that we need games that play 3D graphincs with something like passive 3D LCD. (The image I points to is someone who just upgraded his display to NVIDIA GTX660 and playing Guild Wars 2 with special 3D support.

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    JoshRoss

    I suspect the tv part was put in for two reasons, women and Apple. I couldn't see my wife getting excited to play some crappy football game or wanting to blow up someone, so that a 3d scanned dog could later eat their face.

    Apple is late to the game, and someone wanted to be there first.

    -Josh

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    figuerres

    , cheong wrote

    Who want to use XBox to play TV content when people plug XBox to TV already?

    Sure, you can use Kinect to change channel or what, but that's not very important to daily TV watching experience.

    That said, someone tell Microsoft that we need games that play 3D graphincs with something like passive 3D LCD. (The image I points to is someone who just upgraded his display to NVIDIA GTX660 and playing Guild Wars 2 with special 3D support.

    I have a pc running windows media center that my xbox connects to, this saves me about $180 a year. the local cable company is only getting about 4 a month for the cable card, if I had to use a set top box they would charge me more money.

    the only problems now are that the xbox one does not have a cable card slot and it looks like the cable companies and the US standards for cable / iptv and such are in a mess where it may be another 5 to 10 years before we figure out what will replace the current set top boxes that use cable cards.  US cable tv is a real mess of mini monopolies and fiefdoms and hardware and content companies trying to make more money by forcing consumers to pay for hardware and content they do not need / want to get the content they do want.

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    Bas

    That's the case over here too. Except it's not mini monopolies: it's two massive monopolies, and no-one else. The paying for more hardware and content thing is rampant here too.

    I can't see the Xbox One working with one of our cable companies at all. It doesn't appear to have a tuner or card slot, and with HDMI in and an IR blaster, you still have to deal with the cable company's crappy UI and associated software. Which sort of defeats the entire point of the One.

    I imagine a few years into the one's lifetime nobody has to deal with this crap anymore and everybody will just get their content from online services, but that doesn't help come november.

    Price notwithstanding, I still see the One as a better allround solution than Apple TV/Google TV/Samsung SmartTV though, which I guess is the actual point of the device.

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    Auxon0

    Maybe they'll use something like Aereo:

    "Aereo streams live TV shows over the Internet to subscribers. The company obtains the shows by capturing over-the-air TV broadcasts. Aereo houses millions of dime-sized TV antennas at its facilities and assigns one of these high-tech rabbit ears to each customer. From their PCs, customers control which stations the antennas pick up and can also access DVRs. Aereo managers say all they do is enable users to view freely available OTA broadcasts with the use of their PCs." - http://www.theverge.com/2013/4/2/4174748/whats-next-for-aereo-and-online-tv & http://www.forbes.com/sites/tristanlouis/2013/04/13/aereo-the-future-of-tv-is-here-today/

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    figuerres

    , Bas wrote

    That's the case over here too. Except it's not mini monopolies: it's two massive monopolies, and no-one else. The paying for more hardware and content thing is rampant here too.

    I can't see the Xbox One working with one of our cable companies at all. It doesn't appear to have a tuner or card slot, and with HDMI in and an IR blaster, you still have to deal with the cable company's crappy UI and associated software. Which sort of defeats the entire point of the One.

    I imagine a few years into the one's lifetime nobody has to deal with this crap anymore and everybody will just get their content from online services, but that doesn't help come november.

    Price notwithstanding, I still see the One as a better allround solution than Apple TV/Google TV/Samsung SmartTV though, which I guess is the actual point of the device.

    Yeah, *IF* the cable companies would settle on a good standard they could get out of most of the hardware crap.

    for example if HDMI could tell a device to do a channel change in a standard way.

    the HDMI cable spec says the cables can be really long if needed.

    or if they had a standard TCP/IP spec for control .... and send the av signal over HDMI

    I am thinking like the US FCC idea of a home gateway.

    one box that could take the cable or fiber coming into the home and have jacks for Ethernet, HDMI and whatever.

    the One is an attempt at the right thing in a market that has too many kings each with different rules.

    the cable card I think is a fine device and *could* be the standard but the cable companies seem to have spent too much time fighting it so that no retail market ever really took it and ran with it.

    I wonder if the cable companies and the fcc in the US might be better off re-evaluating the idea and just run with  it.

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    figuerres

    , FuncOfT wrote

    Maybe they'll use something like Aereo:

    "Aereo streams live TV shows over the Internet to subscribers. The company obtains the shows by capturing over-the-air TV broadcasts. Aereo houses millions of dime-sized TV antennas at its facilities and assigns one of these high-tech rabbit ears to each customer. From their PCs, customers control which stations the antennas pick up and can also access DVRs. Aereo managers say all they do is enable users to view freely available OTA broadcasts with the use of their PCs." - http://www.theverge.com/2013/4/2/4174748/whats-next-for-aereo-and-online-tv & http://www.forbes.com/sites/tristanlouis/2013/04/13/aereo-the-future-of-tv-is-here-today/

    the problem is that does nothing for the cable only channels like say Nat Geo, History, HBO, TNT and so on...   and to use the companion apps today you have to pay for a sub for the channels.

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    quibit

    , Bas wrote

    Price notwithstanding, I still see the One as a better allround solution than Apple TV/Google TV/Samsung SmartTV though, which I guess is the actual point of the device.

     That's kind of baffling. Sony tried it in the console market and failed, they never made up for all the losses of PS3 and this is the same company that managed to sell 150 million PS2 units.

    Why does MS think they can make one system to compete with multiple competitors in different markets? that's absurd. The people who buy it for TV won't buy games which is how money is made on these machines. People who buy it for games will ignore it given the machine is not the best dedicated gaming machine out there.

    I think the decisions for XBOX are being made outside the XBOX division by the higher ups at MS who know nothing about this. They're in for a rude awakening.  

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    Bass

    @quibit:

    Samsung's smart TVs also have the major advantage of not charging you $5/month to use Netflix. Nobody is going to get a Xbox One for Internet video if they still force you to have Gold membership to use apps.

    I don't see how they are going to compete with TV makers on this because quite frankly it's not wholly complicated to add the ability to play video from the Internet to a TV, it's quite hard to get wrong.

    Pretty soon everyone is going to have TVs that come with apps built in, it's pretty standard in pretty much all mid-to-high range TVs these days and they can go watch video to all the major video providers (I doubt Google will allow Xbox One to support YouTube for instance). Just like all TVs have IR receivers. This ability to play "channels from the Internet" going to be a basic feature of any TV you buy. You can also browse arbitrary web sites with a full featured Webkit web browser, all without having any extra boxes hanging around. It's a bit like trying to "compete with Ford" by selling spoilers and body kits.

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    blowdart

    , Bass wrote

    @quibit:

    Samsung's smart TVs also have the major advantage of not charging you $5/month to use Netflix. Nobody is going to get a Xbox One for Internet video if they still force you to have Gold membership to use apps.

    I don't see how they are going to compete with TV makers on this because quite frankly it's not wholly complicated to add the ability to play video from the Internet to a TV, it's quite hard to get wrong.

    Except, and I speak as someone who has a Samsung TV with apps both Netflix and Amazon have already abandoned my two year TV and won't update their apps for it...

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    Charles

    It's not that it's TV-capable, but how so and what that actually means (it's more than signal processing...). It's not that the device can see, hear and speak to you, but how so and what that actually means (there is no predetermined limit to what you can do with it - as programmers and users alike).

    An Xbox One comes with 300,000 servers. That's a big computer. How will you use it? What will you do? What will you make? Nothing about what we know about the device limits the possibilities of how you can leverage it - use it, program it, innovate with it. Plus, all the details aren't yet public (and I, like you, don't know what they are and eagerly await E3).

    (the video is cute and funny, but that's all it is...)

    C

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    kettch

    @blowdart: My TV has Netflix and a couple of other video apps. They all suck.

    I don't do a lot of gaming or watch live TV, but I have an Xbox because it handles the scenarios that I use better than even a dedicated media PC. Also because "Xbox...pause". Nuff said.

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    blowdart

    , kettch wrote

    @blowdart: My TV has Netflix and a couple of other video apps. They all suck.

    I don't do a lot of gaming or watch live TV, but I have an Xbox because it handles the scenarios that I use better than even a dedicated media PC. Also because "Xbox...pause". Nuff said.

    I have a noisy xbox. I don't use it for media at all.

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