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iPhone 5

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  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    @Ian2: Is there any way I can check that without having a Windows Phone?

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    @Sven Groot: Try Maps.Nokia.com

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    @Ian2: That has absolutely nothing for Japan. Try zooming in on it, it has nothing beyond major highways. Nothing I searched for yielded any results.

    I hope those aren't the maps used on WP7 phones in Japan. If they are, it's no wonder I have never, ever seen one here yet.

  • User profile image
    Blue Ink

    , Sven Groot wrote

    ...

    This is almost as bad as Bing.

    ...

    I guess my next phone will have to be an Android since those are now the only ones with decent maps.

    That's interesting.

    None of the big names seem to have maps of Japan, for some reason, which explains why Nokia/Navteq maps are in such a sorry state in your area. It turns out that both Bing and Google licensed Zenrin's data for Japan, which would make me expect the two to have similar performances. You seem to think otherwise, though; which makes me think that Bing botches your queries somehow; care to elaborate?

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    @Blue Ink: The main problem is that with Bing, it makes a difference which version of the site you're using. To get any meaningful results for Japan, you must use the Japanese version of the site. Even though the map data is the same, the English version of the site just refuses to find most things. And if you're using the Japanese version of the site, all the UI is in Japanese; far from ideal for a non-native speaker like myself.

    The only thing I've managed to get working is major cities or stations, which the English Bing Maps site recognizes (but only if typed in kanji). The Japanese Bing Maps site can successfully search for addresses, businesses, etc., but again typing in kanji or (in some cases) kana is required.

    For Google Maps it doesn't matter whether you're on the Japanese or English site. It will recognize most station and city names both entered in kanji and romanized. Addresses only work in kanji, their romanized version may work but it's not reliable. Businesses work fine, but need to be typed as listed, so usually in kanji/kana. But the main point is you can do all this from the English site. Sure, if you try to find directions it will list some of the stations and roads or whatever in kanji, but at least the directions themselves are easier to understand.

    Whichever mobile phone OS first manages to get maps with all text, place names, road names, etc. in English, and at least the ability to search addresses in English (business names may not be practical, though it would be nice if it could map a query for McDonald's to マクドナルド) will own the foreigner market in Japan. I even told this to several Windows Phone PMs back at MIX11, but I don't think it helped.

    It's funny that AU has a pamphlet with "recommended apps" for Windows Phone 7.5, and one of them is Navitime, a popular Japanese GPS navigation and maps app. Smiley Of course, Navitime is not free (I think it may even be a subscription service, but I'm not 100% sure).

    EDIT: Okay, I just found out you can use romanized station names, but you better use exactly the right romanization. For example, the station near where I live cannot be found as "Seijogakuenmae" (which is what Google lists it as), you have to search for "Seijō Gakuenmae-eki, Japan". This way you can also get public transit directions, in English, although they are mission fare information with the Japanese Bing and English Google both have.

  • User profile image
    Blue Ink

    @Sven Groot: I don't look up Japanese places often, if ever, but I think Bing maps must have changed a lot in recent times as it seems to behave like Google. Maybe they changed provider, or something.

    You can use Romaji, and it won't be picky about orthography: "seijo gakuenmae eki" will work fine. What is maddening is that the map actually shows the English name of the place (which is "Seijogakuen Mae", for some reason) which doesn't help much as you cannot search for it.

    Sucks, but at least for me it sounds like a plan: learn a bunch of words, fiddle with word breaking. Nothing wrong with empirism, and it still beats the heck out of learning how to type in Kana.

    Incidentally, they may have taken you to the letter about McDonald's: one of the notable features of Zenrin's maps is that it displays the logos of a few major brands, including McDonald's and Starbucks. That should help your WiFi needs Smiley 

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    As a Taiwanese, I really dont know how to search in English on a map in my home country. Chinese only for me. Besides the translation is terrible sometimes, like Taiwanese official spell Gutting instead of Goo Teen  (and yes the first word pronounce Goo, not Gut). The English version is only good when the other person can't understand Chinese using terrible translations.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    elmer

    Apple maps is a bit of a disaster in Australia too - the map data is woefully out of date, the overhead images are pathetically bad, and the information on public transport is, at times, useless.

    One of the funnier gaffs was that the location marked for Apple's own Sydney store, is on the wrong side of the street - I'm guessing they'll fix that one quick.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    , Blue Ink wrote

    Sucks, but at least for me it sounds like a plan: learn a bunch of words, fiddle with word breaking. Nothing wrong with empirism, and it still beats the heck out of learning how to type in Kana.

    Or I could just use Google Maps, where things are actually searchable by what the sign in the actual place says, and I don't need to guess what arbitrary breaks were inserted.

    And English Bing maps still refuses to find addresses or businesses, regardless of how you type them. You have to use the Japanese site.

    I know the logos of certain businesses are shown, and McDonald's happens to be one of them, but I was making more of a general point. Besides, you still need to know to use the Japanese site and search for マクドナルド, unless you think scouring the map manually for a tiny logo is an alternative to the search box.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    , elmer wrote

    Apple maps is a bit of a disaster in Australia too - the map data is woefully out of date, the overhead images are pathetically bad, and the information on public transport is, at times, useless.

    One of the funnier gaffs was that the location marked for Apple's own Sydney store, is on the wrong side of the street - I'm guessing they'll fix that one quick.

     

    MMmm. This seems to be a case of varying mileage. London seems pretty sharp, but things seem to get very very strange outside the capital: I seem to live inside a pixelated blur... which isn't too far from the truth, but still.

     

  • User profile image
    BitFlipper

    This is pretty much the definition of form over function.

    Check this, this, this.

    But hey, it makes for a pretty demo. I've already seen reviews where they "forget" to mention the maps.

    The thing is you can't fix something like this in a week or two. Supposedly the maps are out of date all over the place. It's not a simple one line bug fix. And it's not like they are going to go back to Google maps again.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    , BitFlipper wrote

    This is pretty much the definition of form over function.

    Check this, this, this.

    But hey, it makes for a pretty demo. I've already seen reviews where they "forget" to mention the maps.

    The thing is you can't fix something like this in a week or two. Supposedly the maps are out of date all over the place. It's not a simple one line bug fix. And it's not like they are going to go back to Google maps again.

    I just hope that the rumours of Google submitting Maps to the app store are true, and that it'll get approved fast. In the mean time I'm using the Google Maps mobile site. It's clunky, but still better than Apple's maps.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    , Sven Groot wrote

    *snip*

    I just hope that the rumours of Google submitting Maps to the app store are true, and that it'll get approved fast. In the mean time I'm using the Google Maps mobile site. It's clunky, but still better than Apple's maps.

    Would that even make it through the approval process though? They don't allow apps that duplicate functionality that's already provided by built-in apps, right? Like how you can only submit a "browser" that's just a different shell around Safari? Or have they relaxed those rules since?

  • User profile image
    elmer

    , Bas wrote

    Would that even make it through the approval process though?

    Given the current state of animosity between them...

    http://www.groklaw.net/pdf3/775088-488817.pdf

    It's hard to see Apple approving anything that even mentions the word Google.

  • User profile image
    elmer
  • User profile image
    Ray7

    , Sven Groot wrote

    *snip*

    I just hope that the rumours of Google submitting Maps to the app store are true, and that it'll get approved fast. In the mean time I'm using the Google Maps mobile site. It's clunky, but still better than Apple's maps.

    Apparently there's a year left on Apple's Google maps contract, so Google thought they had a year to build a standalone replacement. It looks like they're not going to have anything ready for a few months yet.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    Bloody hell! An apology! 

    To our customers,

    At Apple, we strive to make world-class products that deliver the best experience possible to our customers. With the launch of our new Maps last week, we fell short on this commitment. We are extremely sorry for the frustration this has caused our customers and we are doing everything we can to make Maps better.

    We launched Maps initially with the first version of iOS. As time progressed, we wanted to provide our customers with even better Maps including features such as turn-by-turn directions, voice integration, Flyover and vector-based maps. In order to do this, we had to create a new version of Maps from the ground up.

    There are already more than 100 million iOS devices using the new Apple Maps, with more and more joining us every day. In just over a week, iOS users with the new Maps have already searched for nearly half a billion locations. The more our customers use our Maps the better it will get and we greatly appreciate all of the feedback we have received from you.

    While we're improving Maps, you can try alternatives by downloading map apps from the App Store like Bing, MapQuest and Waze, or use Google or Nokia maps by going to their websites and creating an icon on your home screen to their web app.

    Everything we do at Apple is aimed at making our products the best in the world. We know that you expect that from us, and we will keep working non-stop until Maps lives up to the same incredibly high standard.

    Tim Cook
    Apple's CEO

     

    Jobs really has left the building.

    http://techcrunch.com/2012/09/28/tim-cook-apologizes-for-apple-maps-points-to-competitive-alternatives/

    Thanks for that, Tim. Now FIX IT!

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    @Sven Groot: Can't you downgrade back to iOS 5? I assume you are on iPhone 4

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