Coffeehouse Thread

30 posts

why don't power supplies come with a built in UPS?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • Craig_​Matthews

    , SteveRichter wrote

    *snip*

     ( figuerres, there are not problems shipping laptops with connected batteries. )

    Fedex makes us clearly label any box we ship that contains Li-ion. Additionally, every laptop we've purchased comes brand new in the box (also Li-ion labeled) with the battery in a plastic bag separate from the laptop. According to the shipping company, we're supposed to do the same when we ship laptops back out.

  • Ion Todirel

    @androidi:

    , androidi wrote

    @SteveRichter:

    3) there could be motherboard input for a battery that is used to keep RAM powered after the PSU caps run out and there was not enough time to flush data to SSD. maybe a driver could be made to write the cpu and RAM to SSD with this battery power at minimal CPU clock speed while GPU's etc buses are powered off

    some SSDs already do this, they use capacitors and have power input detection, some even report S.M.A.R.T. failures if the capacitors go bad

  • ZippyV

    2 things you can do:

    - Buy a PSU that is overkill. I've got a 900 W powersupply and when I see the lights in my room go out for a second the pc just keeps running.

    - Buy a UPS. Why not?

  • abner0322

    It is here...I have a HP p7-1423w that I bought in December 2012.  When you unplug the power cord, the green light on the PSU stays on for a few minutes.  In my area, we get frequent power outages for a few minutes at a time...I'm convinced that's what killed my last desktop.  With my new computer, it starts normally after every power outage...no safe mode message or anything.  It's great.  I haven't yet been able to find any literature on this, but I know I have it.

  • figuerres

    , abner0322 wrote

    It is here...I have a HP p7-1423w that I bought in December 2012.  When you unplug the power cord, the green light on the PSU stays on for a few minutes.  In my area, we get frequent power outages for a few minutes at a time...I'm convinced that's what killed my last desktop.  With my new computer, it starts normally after every power outage...no safe mode message or anything.  It's great.  I haven't yet been able to find any literature on this, but I know I have it.

    No you have been luck so far.....

     

    the led:   an LED does not need much power, in  the power supply and system board some leds will stay on for a minute or two as parts called "capacitors" act a bit like a small battery and take time to drain the power they held.  totally not the same as a battery backup.  I would say go get a backup unit and plug in the usb data cable and be safe.

  • ScanIAm

    There's nothing to keep manufacturers from creating a UPS in the shape of an ATX power supply.  I don't know how much of the ATX internals are devoted to the various rail circuitry, but if it's minimal enough, then why not do this.  The rest of the PSU hardware could exist as a block like those that are on the power cords of every laptop out there.

    Just don't expect the PC to run for hours when the power comes down, but I can't see why it isn't doable.

  • blowdart

    , ScanIAm wrote

    There's nothing to keep manufacturers from creating a UPS in the shape of an ATX power supply.

    Like this - http://www.nipron.com/dc_ups/

     

  • DrReD

    Put a battery inside its servers Goole does. So doable and convenient it is. (YODA!)

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-10209580-92.html

     

  • Jim Young

    I remember way back the PC AT style computers being able to survive a brief sub-second power glitch. The capacitors in the power supplies must of been huge.

  • Bass

    Cost, and computer hardware is a race to the bottom. With the added implication that anyone who has wants a UPS probably has one. Also, UPS also keeps the monitor up which lets you save your work and what not more coherently.

  • USArcher

    ASUS has introduced the G10 desktop PC which includes an expansion bay that can accommodate a optional mobile power pack that when plugged into the expansion bay provides mini UPS capability (only has 20 sec runtime though).  When unplugged it acts like a portable USB charger.  Interesting approach and general node to mobile dominance.

    For me, I like some of the all-in-one PC we are seeing (Sony Tap 20, Dell XPS 18, Lenovo IdeaCentre Horizon, HP Rove 20).

     

  • ScanIAm

    Hmmm, this thread must have fallen off the front page.  I'm pricing out new components, now, so I may just try that. 

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.