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windows 8 speech sent to microsoft

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  • swheaties

    Just bought a lumia 920, I absolutely love it its a beautiful phone. Its my second windows phone. I went to use the speech feature to compose a message and was amazed to see that I will "Send the words you speak and supporting data, including recent contact names to Microsoft..." Amazing. Unbelievable. If I speak an intimate message to my girlfriend, which I often do, I have all the employees at MS listening to me so they can "... improve the speech recognition service". Is there any ms employee here that will honestly say they will use the windows phone speech recognition service for private conversations without constantly wondering what dork in a server room somewhere is listening in?? Be honest. YES I KNOW the dork has access to every email and text message I send, every physical location visit and take my phone, where I surf on the internet, what I buy, where I buy, where I work, where I live, what I earn, my hobbies and interests. But now the dork is going to be STANDING IN THE SAME ROOM WITH ME while I speak a message to someone? What a complete and total intrusion. It actually changes what I will say and how I will say it. The thought that my message may be the joke of the day at Microsoft and their numerous "affiliates" will be constantly on my mind while I speak. I don't want to return this phone. I already returned an android. I'm going to try an iphone, if their privacy isn't any better it looks like I'm going to be back to a basic flip phone. I'm so bummed. I've never posted a video to youtube. I think I will post this feature on youtube to help others make an informed decision before they purchase a windows phone.

  • JoshRoss
  • blowdart

    , swheaties wrote

    . I'm going to try an iphone, if their privacy isn't any better it looks like I'm going to be back to a basic flip phone.

    Then back to a flip phone you go. Apple does the same with Siri, heck they pioneered it. Phones simply aren't powerful enough to process speech without some help from backend services.

  • ZippyV

    , blowdart wrote

    *snip*

    Then back to a flip phone you go. Apple does the same with Siri, heck they pioneered it. Phones simply aren't powerful enough to process speech without some help from backend services.

    The reason they send the speech over is so they can improve the service without having to update the client. Also, they can run analytics on all the saved speeches and see what people are actually asking.

  • Vaccano

    Privacy now days (to me) is that nobody cares. Your speech to text is one of thousands. No one cares who you are what you said, beyond the ability to correctly parse it. But hey, if you got something super secret to say, try typing it rather than going back to a flip phone.

  • Deactivated User

    Comment removed at user's request.

  • blowdart

    , jinx101 wrote

    That's na├»ve IMO.  That's like saying that nobody cares about your email communications or other data.  Of course they care.  It's part of who you are and to advertisers and corporations, that's very appealing.  I understand why they send it to "the cloud" but to pretend like that's not something that corporations would be interested in storing and mining is just wrong (that's like saying, well, you're one in a hundred million, so no one cares what you're searching in Google... which isn't' true... you're a small portion of the pie but they very much care to know what you're searching for and how you're using the Internet).

    Yes, but outlook.com for example doesn't look into your emails to target you for adverts.

    You can also look at the privacy statement for speech;

    When you use the speech recognition service on your phone for speech-enabled features or apps, whether provided by Microsoft or third-parties, your speech input and performance data associated with the speech functionality, such as changes you manually make to text and the final text result, ("speech data") will be automatically sent to Microsoft to process and respond to the request, and to improve the speech service. To better tune our speech recognition algorithms, your recent contact names (but not phone numbers or other contact information) will also be sent to Microsoft. You will be prompted to enable the speech recognition service when you first attempt to use any speech functionality.

    When speech data is sent to Microsoft, Microsoft generates a unique ID that is stored on your phone and sent with requests to distinguish requests from different phones. The unique ID is a randomly generated number that does not contain any information to identify you personally. Accordingly, the speech data is not associated with you or your device.

    If you disable the speech recognition service, you will not be able to search online using your voice or send a message via voice, but you may still be able to use other simple voice commands supported solely on the phone, such as "Call Mom" or "Start Internet Explorer."

    Your Choices:

    To prevent speech data from being sent to Microsoft, if you've previously enabled:

    1. Go to Settings > Speech.
    2. Uncheck Enable Speech Recognition Service.
  • davewill

    @blowdart:  This part make me giggle

    When speech data is sent to Microsoft, Microsoft generates a unique ID that is stored on your phone and sent with requests to distinguish requests from different phones. The unique ID is a randomly generated number that does not contain any information to identify you personally. Accordingly, the speech data is not associated with you or your device.

    Hello.  The unique ID is the association.

  • Minh

    I'd like MS to give me feedback on my "sweet nothings", for example "You might want to rethink comparing her thighs to Olympic cyclists, she might take it the wrong way"

  • kettch

    @davewill: Given that unique ID, is there a way to track back to you? I doubt it.

    A search query probably looks like this:

    Phone: I want to do a search. My ID is 1234, and my query is "find me pizza near 5th street"
    

    That's only conjecture based on the privacy statement, but from the server's point of view, 1234 is just a number and there's nothing to tie it to a person. If they were caching more than that, it would be a problem. However, that would mean that their privacy statement was dishonest, which is highly unlikely.

  • davewill

    @kettch: True.  I was thinking along the lines of knock, knock, knock, let us in, we have a search warrant.

    Next thing you know it is 24/7 news coverage of Minh's trial and we are subjected to hearing his "sweet nothings" played in open court. Smiley

  • Minh

    I'd assume the unique ID is a 1-way hash of my phone. When I hear "search warrant", that phone is going into the toilet... whoops... clumsy me...

    no way to compare the hash now

  • blowdart

    , davewill wrote

    Hello.  The unique ID is the association.

    So I can create a random guid and say it's assigned to you? This could be fun ....

  • kettch

    @davewill: A search warrant served where? If it were served at Microsoft, they would get sweet nothings and an ID. There wouldn't be any way to map the ID back to Minh. If they seized his phone, there's probably plenty of evidence on it already, and who knows where the ID is stored.

  • MasterPi

    The data is pretty much useless if they can't associate data points - you'd be stuck with weird generalizations of the kind "a good percentage of people use accessibility settings in calendar, so maybe we should make everything bigger" vs "a good percentage of the people who have bad eyesight use accessibility settings in calendar, so maybe we should make an option to enlarge things."

  • Proton2

    , blowdart wrote

    *snip*

    So I can create a random guid and say it's assigned to you? This could be fun ....

     

    Can GUIDs be "random" ?

  • blowdart

    , Proton2 wrote

    *snip*

     

    Can GUIDs be "random" ?

    Read the UUID spec.

    Version 4 UUIDs use a scheme relying only on random numbers. This algorithm sets the version number as well as two reserved bits. All other bits are set using a random or pseudorandom data source. Version 4 UUIDs have the form xxxxxxxx-xxxx-4xxx-yxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx where x is any hexadecimal digit and y is one of 8, 9, a, or b. e.g. f47ac10b-58cc-4372-a567-0e02b2c3d479.

  • blowdart

    , Minh wrote

    I'd assume the unique ID is a 1-way hash of my phone. When I hear "search warrant", that phone is going into the toilet... whoops... clumsy me...

    no way to compare the hash now

    Yea. because your phone company hasn't been keeping copies of everything ....

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