This is the Twitter client I wrote earlier in the year for Windows Mobile (specifically, Windows Mobile Classic and Professional, to use the new official names that convey no useful information whatsoever). That is, Windows Mobile for touch screen devices, or what we used to call Pocket PC. Unfortunately the "People I follow" option has not worked since the Twitter developers did something back in I think August that caused the https://twitter.com/statuses/friends.xml call to handle authentication incorrectly, with the effect that it now always returns a "not found" error. This bug has been notified on the Twitter forum and commented on by numerous people, but they haven't done anything about it. Consequently I decided not to do any further work with what is obviously an unstable and unsupported API.
Other people may have more patience than me and feel inclined to implement a work around to deal with this issue and whichever others arise subsequently - those people might find this code of some use.
Anyone who sees that I render every word in a tweet separately will no doubt conclude that I'm insane, stupid or both: it was my solution to the problem of rendering links correctly along with ordinary text for any arbitrary input string, while positioning everything (more or less) correctly. I never liked it, but it did the trick and wasn't as slow as I'd feared ("Good enough for free", was my thought, to be honest).
  I do sincerely apologise for the lack of comments: I was writing the code for myself and yes, I confess, largely making it up as I went along (see again under "Good enough for free"). I do feel guilty however about the lack of explanatory comments.
Despite all that there may be bits and pieces here that provide some people with useful ideas. I'm pretty pleased with the overall look (not so much with having to use interop code to achieve it), and I think the "finger-swipey stuff" is at least a good start. Speaking of fingers, I made a conscious effort to be "finger-friendly" (and the swipey bit was part of that, as were the admittedly somewhat garish buttons on the dialogs), although my main objective with this program was to break away from the Godawful VB4-ish look that the Compact Framework tends to impose on us (I'd like to do something similar for Diarist, but since the input controls occupy almost the entire display area I haven't worked out how as yet).

PS. If you've actually used Twitula and had never noticed that there was integrated help, don't spend too much time slapping your forehead. Anyone could make that mistake.