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How hard is it to write a .NET app that uses SQL Server 2k5?

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    Halvor

    Winston Pang wrote:
    Hey guys ive been wondering firstly.

    For SQL 2K5 based apps what does the target use require to have installed to have it run first?

    Then next, how hard is it to open a connection and save and delete records etc using .NET?

    Are there any succinct guides to this?

    I can't find many.

    Thanks.


    What exactly do you mean? SQL 2005 is no different in use than the others. (at least not for CRUD commands). To be able to make to most of it, you need visual studio 2005. The CRUD (save and delete etc) are then almost done automatically.

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    W3bbo

    Winston Pang wrote:
    Then next, how hard is it to open a connection and save and delete records etc using .NET?


    The same way it is with SQL Server 2000 and 7.0, just use System.Data.SqlClient's SqlConnection, SqlCommand, SqlDataAdapter, and SqlDataReader classes.

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    Sven Groot

    Winston Pang wrote:
    Becaue i use to see that most people have the little SQL server icon running in the tray.

    That's only if you're running SQL Server (quite likely MSDE, actually) on the local computer. If you just want your app to connect to some remote SQL Server, all you need is the .Net Framework.

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    anthq11

    1.  I want to use SQL for a web application, so i guess the target server which hosts the web app must have SQL 2K5 installed?

    not necessarily.

    you can, depending on your code, change the host, but you could also have a web refrence/service that preforms your functions of a remote web server.  That Web Servie would have to be on the server with the SQL 2005 installed.

    2.  So what differs between all these versions?

    who knows...betterness, management?

    3.  It's really more features and limitations wise right?

    i guess so.  SQL2005, from the LAUCH Confrence comes with 1 CAL. you kneed 1 for each request or ip or device on to the SQL Server.

    4.  Also when you install SQL Server 2005 is it basically just a bundle of applications as well as a database engine?

    yeah.  You get the SQL Server Management studio, which is really for SQL Queries and setting up tables and db accounts, and dbs.

    5.  Also when you install SQL Server 2005 is it basically just a bundle of applications as well as a database engine?

    my guess would be to power the database - essantially what MS Access does, except thats all integrated into 1 program.

    6.  And also, what's the other tools there for? DB Maintenance?

    yup! management and maintenance.

    7.  Also what's the difference between the System.Data.Sql and the Microsoft.SqlServer.Server

    System.Data.Sql is for retrieving and sending data into and out of the databse (server), while Microsoft.SqlServer.Server is more for configuring options and such (i think, havent used that much...).

    Hope that helps.

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    cheong

    Winston Pang wrote:
    Thanks.

    So ok let me clarify once more.

    There's SQL 2005 Express, Enterprise, Pro etc...

    So each of these versions have more tools as they go up in levels.

    But they all fundamentally have the SQL service installed which manages any SQL 2005 base databases right?

    So i've been reading that the express editions have limitations i.e. like using 1gb memory, only single cpu support and 4gb size limit.

    So does that mean that the SQL Service that manages the SQL databases on the server actually differs across each version then?

    Their functionality differs.

    For example, Express edition(or MSDE in SQL2k), it's primary for developers use only. It has a connection limit for 5 or so and CPU limit to 2 and lower usable memory limit. In short, it's a light version for development purpose only and not quite suitable for deployment (although I've seen someone doing so) It's also the only version that'll install on WinXP (or non-server OS).

    You may want to check it yourself here.

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    PerfectPhase

    Winston Pang wrote:

    Well yeah i realised the express edition can only support up to 4gb in file size, which is quite ridiculous for deployment in real-world applications.


    Don't be so quick to dismiss Express (or MSDE), I can think of about a dozen apps of the top of my head that use it, for example WSUS, ISA and Backup Exec.  It provides a good cheap way to get your app installed, as the userbase/dataset grows you can migrate to one of the more fully featured versions. 

    Winston Pang wrote:

    What i want to know is:

    - What does the main server or end-user require to have installed if the application/web application makes use of SQL Server 2005.


    The application requires .Net only.

    You must also (on the same machine or an other) install SQL Server (this can be Express/Standard/etc depending on your needs).  This will install the service that allows you to talk to your data.

    If you want to create a database in SQL server you will need a management tool, such as Enterprise Manager (included with the standard and above products), Sql Server manager Express http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=82afbd59-57a4-455e-a2d6-1d4c98d40f6e&displaylang=en or Visual Studio. 

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    thepuffin

    Winston, you seem to be more than a little confused about how SQL Server works.

    From an application point of view, all you need to do is use the standard .Net System.Data.SqlClient classes, providing a standard OLEDB connection string which specifies the database and server to connect to.

    You then need to have a machine, somewhere, that has a version of SQL Server installed on it.  This machine will host the database engine and the databases themselves.

    As for the version of SQL Server to use, I suggest you take a look at http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinfo/features/compare-features.mspx to help you decide.  Simply put, SQL Express will more than likely be good enough for most web applications, and considering your lack of knowledge of the SQL Server platform you are unlikely to be able to make use of the additional features of the other editions.

    If you do need to go to Standard or Enterprise editions, be aware that there are different licensing methods - per CPU or per CAL.  For a web application you will need to buy a license per CPU, but if you are doing an intranet application it may be cheaper to licence per user.

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