Tech Off Thread

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What, the only technical stuff has to be programming related?

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  • User profile image
    kclemson

    What about all of us IT pro types out there, eh?

    Smiley

  • User profile image
    Charles

    kclemson wrote:
    What about all of us IT pro types out there, eh?

    Smiley



    Programming is only one facet of computing. IT is another. Perhaps I was too codey in my preamble. I'll state for the record that Techoff is for everything technical in nature assuming it is also at least tangentially-related to computing, be it computer theory, or general relativity.

    Keep on posting,

    Charles

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    kclemson wrote:
    What about all of us IT pro types out there, eh?

    Smiley



    It's okay KC, I'm with you. I don't mind the programmers because I used to be one Wink

    You'll be happy to know we're bringing 25 new servers on-line in our test lab to see if we can roll out Linux / MS / Novell platform all over onto AD... It'll be a hard sell because the senior server guy here is Mr Novell, but it'll definitely be an interesting few weeks!

  • User profile image
    eagle

    Windows Server 2003 will be 1 year old this Saturday, April 24!

         So let's have a party!

  • User profile image
    Karthik

    What about us Computer Science types out here? Smiley

    (the sometime-programming mostly algorithmic kind)

  • User profile image
    kclemson

    Indeed, I wouldn't have a job without programmers (who else would I herd? Just kiddin').

    Very glad to hear! Let me know how it goes. Smiley

  • User profile image
    Lwatson

    Here at TAI I am not only the lead software developer but depending on the need any of us ( Read usually me ) is also a wires and pliers kind of guy. Long before I got into software I was a hardware kind of guy. My biggest mistake and most memorable hack came on the same day when I was building the prototype of a new design for a piece of data monitoring equipment. We had only the components for a single wire wrap prototype. I was carefully wiring up each of the 64 pins of this large IC socket that was to house the main PLA component. Having just finished the last pin I discovered that the diagram was showing the top VIEW and not the bottom view of the board. I had wired everything backwards and mirrored. DOH!.

    We were running out of time so rather than undo all my handywork I carefully took the PLA chip and bent all pins up 180 degrees so the were pointing up rather than down as is usual. I then inserted the chip upside down and backwards into the socket. The thing worked like a charm. I told management that this was to hide the identity of the chip from the folks observing the demonstration. Stupid mistake on my part for sure but I came out of it with colors. That was like 20 years ago and I still remember the deep feelings of dred and highs of elation all in a 5 minute span of time. THose kinds of things just dont seem to happen in the software business all that much. The Deep dred lasts far to long and there are very few elative highs to offset them.

  • User profile image
    LazyCoder

    I'm fascinated by programmers who DON'T have a lot of IT knowledge. Every job I've worked on I've had to be 1/2 programmer, 1/2 systems guy, and 1/2 DBA. (see my point? Wink ). I'd LOVE to only have to worry about programming, but it seems I'm always having to teach IT guys about backup strategies and getting the server configured correctly. We haven't done a security audit of our applications yet, but I can already tell they have holes in them and it's not all the codes fault. I wish there were more IT pros in the world, specifically where I work, so I wouldn't always have to dink with the systems.

    Plus I have to be the "IT Pro" at home too. bleh. I miss my C-64.

    My point being, I hope that IT issues get discussed here too. It's one more source I'll have for keeping up with current trends.

  • User profile image
    ktegels

    LazyCoder wrote:
    I'm fascinated by programmers who DON'T have a lot of IT knowledge. Every job I've worked on I've had to be 1/2 programmer, 1/2 systems guy, and 1/2 DBA. (see my point? Wink ). I'd LOVE to only have to worry about programming, but it seems I'm always having to teach IT guys about backup strategies and getting the server configured correctly. We haven't done a security audit of our applications yet, but I can already tell they have holes in them and it's not all the codes fault. I wish there were more IT pros in the world, specifically where I work, so I wouldn't always have to dink with the systems.

    Plus I have to be the "IT Pro" at home too. bleh. I miss my C-64.

    My point being, I hope that IT issues get discussed here too. It's one more source I'll have for keeping up with current trends.


    Ditto all of that!

  • User profile image
    Lwatson

    I have always felt that a software developer was better equipeed to write good software if they also understood how to build the systems that they were deploying their software on. With the advent of the internet that belief spread to the network that their software executes across. I am amazed at how many 'Software Developers' don't even know what a MAC address is and what its significance is to a working system.

    I recall on instance where a system in a resturaunt was not working properly. The company that I worked for was the vendor of the POS system that was being installed there. The dealer had procurred a bunch of network adapters on the cheap. ( Back then those things were still a bit costly ) But some of the cards had the same mac addresses. These stupid things were not actually marked mind you but they were in fact the same. I had such a hard time convincing the dealer that the bargin they got nearly cost them the whole customer. I had an ever harder time telling the dealer what the problem was in the first place. None of the 'Software Guys' had a clue what I was telling them they automatically assumed that the software was the fault.

    I will invariable now ask a few Hardware questions on any interview even if its strictly a software position.

  • User profile image
    Akaina

    Good call on that!

  • User profile image
    rickywk

    Windows Server 2003.... -_-!

    I just hit a problem(may be a bug)with Group Policy...

    The server dosen't accept any password, just said the password cannot fulfill password policy, but I haven't set any password policy in GP!

    Another overnight work... >_<

  • User profile image
    samdruk

    I'm sure you guys are right, but I started out developing compilers and libraries. You really didn't know a thing about the deployment enviornment and your users we're cutting edge programmers so it didn't matter.

    There are so many facets to computer software that folks forget all the time. Beyond IT and basic coding skills, there are simulations, graphics, PC application development, small embedded systems (like cell phones), large embedded systems (like phone switches and routers), game consoles, system software, numerical analysis and scientific programming, medical systems, robotics-realtime stuff, etc., etc.

    It's easy (particularly living where I do) to forget about the whole range of software out there. I heard a stat that in 1996 the most popular microprocessor in the world (by units) was the Hitachi SH-2. Extra lemonade if anyone can guess why that would be? (and no, I can't vouch for the veracity, it's something a marketing guy told me).

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