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Scientific research and .NET

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  • Charles

    Is anybody out there writing CLR-based computer modeling software or other research tools?

    I'm just trying to get a feel for how the .NET Framework is being used in the scientific world.

    Beyond the increase in your productivity (concentration on algorithms, not memory management implementations), what other pleasant surprises have you encountered when writing managed applications in a research or academic context? What problems have you encountered?


    Keep on posting,

    Charles

  • prog_dotnet
  • prog_dotnet

    NMath - Enterprise Class Numerical Component Libraries for the .NET Platform

    The NMath product suite from CenterSpace Software provides building blocks for mathematical, financial, engineering, and scientific applications on the .NET platform. Features include matrix and vector classes, random number generators, numerical integration methods, statistical functions, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and object-oriented interfaces to public domain computing packages such as the BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms) and LAPACK (Linear Algebra PACKage).


    http://www.centerspace.net/

  • PeteBeech

    There's an article on the BBC technology website, about a "brain control" research project using C#.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/3485918.stm


    Some quotes from the artice:

    "A video game in which the character is controlled directly from a player's brain without the need for wires has been developed by researchers. "

    "Developments like Microsoft's new object-oriented language C#, a variation of C++ but with Java-like functions, have made this signal-processing and translation easier. "

    "Mr Lalor and the rest of the team are keeping up with the plethora of research being done around the world on brain activity and hope to move the work on quickly."

    " 'With the software tools that we have, we can develop stuff a lot quicker than most places.' "

  • GooberDLX

    One of my academic projects from my senior year in college.. (Intelligent systems: Java Genetic Algorithms Framework) .. will eventually be ported to C#. Thinking of waiting for C# 2.0 and Generics before I make an attempt.

    Should be a relatively easy port..

    Anyone know of any Bioinformatics libraries/apps etc based on .Net? I have done some work with BioPerl and BLAST and a few other tools.. but havent seen anything for .Net yet.. something else to add to my to-do list

    Jake

  • Jeremy W

    Charles,

    There are actually some insanely incredible things happening using the .NET Framework. One is a full implementation of the distribution / remoting / analysis software for the huge particle accelerator out in Geneva which'll be up sometime around 2010.

    I know a few people in various universities who were sick of the awful implementations of the existing software and are rewriting these insane apps in C# using .NET.

    Very, very cool.

  • Charles

    Jeremy W. wrote:
    Charles,

    There are actually some insanely incredible things happening using the .NET Framework. One is a full implementation of the distribution / remoting / analysis software for the huge particle accelerator out in Geneva which'll be up sometime around 2010.

    I know a few people in various universities who were sick of the awful implementations of the existing software and are rewriting these insane apps in C# using .NET.

    Very, very cool.


    I'm very glad to hear this. Researchers need to spend most of their time thinking about specific problems that are directly related to their research, not problems that arise from the software tools used in making their research more effective.


    Keep on posting,

    Charles

  • object88

    IIRC, united Devices / grid.org is using .NET for their distributed brute-force cancer and smallpox research project... which reminds me, I haven't installed it yet on my work machine.

  • Charles

    object88 wrote:
    IIRC, united Devices / grid.org is using .NET for their distributed brute-force cancer and smallpox research project... which reminds me, I haven't installed it yet on my work machine.

    Excellent. Now put it on your machine!Smiley

  • addexm

    I work in big pharma, and we are using .NET for a host of applications. For example, data mining, assay and protocol modeling, instumentation acquisition, ontology-based type systems, robotic api's, even some productivity & document tools. I love .net.

    This isn't exactly the kind of research you mentioned but it is research.

  • Charles

    addexm wrote:
    I work in big pharma, and we are using .NET for a host of applications. For example, data mining, assay and protocol modeling, instumentation acquisition, ontology-based type systems, robotic api's, even some productivity & document tools. I love .net.

    This isn't exactly the kind of research you mentioned but it is research.



    More excellence! Thanks for sharing. When you run into problems or have ideas for making your life easier. Don't hesitate to post them here.

    Charles

  • Jeremy W

    I am attempting to create a distributed self-evaluating algorithm which will evaluate the 1000's of variables which make up happiness, in order to determine the inverse relatinoship between happiness and having a crappy Monday.

    So far nobody else has installed the app on their computer though so it's not very distributed Sad

  • sciencec

    I'm working in the field of experimental psychology (uh, better call it 'behavioral sciences', there is too much garbage in psychology...) at the MPI for Human Development (Germany). After writing a lot of code in C++ during the last years (programs for psychological experiments, statistical analysis, simulations, ...), I switched to C# last year. Development is much faster now, mostly due to the dramatically reduced time to find bugs or conceptual errors. Moreover, there is a bunch of technologies that I actually use now in my daily work (e.g. Managed DirectX, component development, XML/XSLT, GDI+, remoting, distributed computing, targeting mobile devices) but seemed - at least to me - sometimes too complicated to use with Visual C++ and MFC (yes, I'm not a computer scientist by education; and yes, I do think that COM is pretty complicated!).

    To sum up: To me, scientific development with C#/.NET is not just simpler and faster than before. It gives also access to a huge toolbox that allows me to develop quite different kinds of more or less sophisticated applications that even look better than before (finally!).        

  • Charles

    Sciencec,

    This is fantastic to hear. The power of the BCL really is awesome.I'm glad that you have discovered this and are taking advantage of it.   

    I'd be interested to know about your overall experience with the migration of unmanaged computationally intensive programs to managed equivalents.


    Charles

  • Dano

    There is also some Astronomy work - SkyServer which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a project to make a map of a large part of the universe and make it accessible via the web and web services.  It currently pulls together (via webservices) 19 databases located throughout the world.  You can test it out at SkyQuery.net

    They also have a subset of the database and code available at http://www.skyserver.org/myskyserver/
    so you can even play with it on your server/laptop.

    Dan

  • Charles

    Yonkee,

    This is fantastic. I am sure you will get some volunteers (maybe some of the members of this site. hint hint) to help test, document, and expand your library. I am going to check it out.

    Charles

  • Yongkee

    It's my first post on Ch.9.

    I have developed a .NET SDK for building Chemistry-related software. The Molecular Object Library (MOL) is now in Sourceforge. (http://mol.sourceforge.net) I believe that MOL may be the first .NET compnent library in this area.

    MOL class hierarchy is mainly based on the .NET framework so that many .NET developers might be familiar with it. MOL is composed of several classes and components which handles file I/O, geometry, and graphics. The molecular graphics of MOL bases on OpenGL.

    The first beta version will be shipped sooner or later. Also, I am looking for volunteers to help complete various pieces of MOL and help move the project forward, I need contributions to:

    1. More tests to the existing class libraries
    2. Document existing class libraries.
    3. Add your own class to MOL

  • GooberDLX

    Im interested.. and in fact.. Im (as we speak) now porting over my Genetic Algorithms framework to .Net

    Jake

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