Tech Off Thread

17 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

Windows 7 RC - sysedit refuses changes

Back to Forum: Tech Off
  • User profile image
    Wookie

    While attempting to write a new key to the sys.ini , Windows 7 refuses to save the changes, (and before anyone replies with you have to turn off UAC and DEP, they were both disabled for this). If anyone knows any workarounds, and would care to share them with me, I would be grateful.

    " If a key doesn't exist... Write It!! " - David Andrews

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    Why do you need to write to sys.ini?

  • User profile image
    Wookie

    ZippyV said:

    Why do you need to write to sys.ini?

    The  "why" doesn't matter. It's being able to that matters.

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    Wookie said:
    ZippyV said:
    *snip*

    The  "why" doesn't matter. It's being able to that matters.

    There is no sys.ini on Windows 7 and Vista.

  • User profile image
    Wookie

    ZippyV said:
    Wookie said:
    *snip*

    There is no sys.ini on Windows 7 and Vista.

    Ok obviously you are a youngster or need clarification , in windows 7 it's now called system.ini , but system.ini and sys.ini are the same thing.  (sys(tem).ini) can be found under sysedit. You see , back in the olden days before msconfig , there was this thing called sysedit. You used sysedit to configure things like boot.ini , sys.ini , etc. etc. When you wrote new keys to things like boot.ini and sys(tem).ini you could get the kernel to act differently.You sorta remind me of one of those first year techs. at my ISP who try to tell me that I have to physically change my NIC card to change my MAC addy. Anyways I am sorry that you got lost following the thread. Follow me, I've got the map!!! Wink

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    Wookie said:
    ZippyV said:
    *snip*

    Ok obviously you are a youngster or need clarification , in windows 7 it's now called system.ini , but system.ini and sys.ini are the same thing.  (sys(tem).ini) can be found under sysedit. You see , back in the olden days before msconfig , there was this thing called sysedit. You used sysedit to configure things like boot.ini , sys.ini , etc. etc. When you wrote new keys to things like boot.ini and sys(tem).ini you could get the kernel to act differently.You sorta remind me of one of those first year techs. at my ISP who try to tell me that I have to physically change my NIC card to change my MAC addy. Anyways I am sorry that you got lost following the thread. Follow me, I've got the map!!! Wink

    It's been called system.ini at least since Windows 95.

    On Windows NT based systems writing to INI files using the Win32 "Profile" APIs redirects to the regsitry according to settings stored here:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\IniFileMapping

    AFAIK, system.ini settings have no effect on the kernel or much of anything else at least since XP if not NT. It's there for 16-bit app compat.

    Edit: I reread that you were using sysedit so nevermind that stuff. I was able to write to my system.ini in a sysedit instance run from an admin level command prompt (I have UAC enebled and zipped up) in Windows 7 Beta (don't have RC installed yet). So I don't know if this is an issue new to Win7 RC or specific to your machine.

     

  • User profile image
    Wookie

    DCMonkey said:
    Wookie said:
    *snip*

    It's been called system.ini at least since Windows 95.

    On Windows NT based systems writing to INI files using the Win32 "Profile" APIs redirects to the regsitry according to settings stored here:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\IniFileMapping

    AFAIK, system.ini settings have no effect on the kernel or much of anything else at least since XP if not NT. It's there for 16-bit app compat.

    Edit: I reread that you were using sysedit so nevermind that stuff. I was able to write to my system.ini in a sysedit instance run from an admin level command prompt (I have UAC enebled and zipped up) in Windows 7 Beta (don't have RC installed yet). So I don't know if this is an issue new to Win7 RC or specific to your machine.

     

    This new generation has me worried!!! If I don't write a swapfile key like say maybe this one ---> ConservativeSwapFileUsage=1 under 386enh in sys.ini then how else am I gonna keep more of the kernel in RAM ?? Superfetch you say?? That may well be, but I am from the old school where we learned everything ourselves and didn't go to a $50K a yr. college to learn it. I like TRIED and TRUE methods.You do know what 386 enhanced is right? The [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file contains information specific to running Windows in 386-enhanced mode, including information used for virtual-memory page swapping. As far as you wondering about my machine DCMonkey, I triple boot XP Professional SP3 (32 Bit), Windows 7 Ultimate RC (32 bit), and Server 2008 Standard SP2 (64 bit).

     

  • User profile image
    KevinB

    Wookie said:
    DCMonkey said:
    *snip*

    This new generation has me worried!!! If I don't write a swapfile key like say maybe this one ---> ConservativeSwapFileUsage=1 under 386enh in sys.ini then how else am I gonna keep more of the kernel in RAM ?? Superfetch you say?? That may well be, but I am from the old school where we learned everything ourselves and didn't go to a $50K a yr. college to learn it. I like TRIED and TRUE methods.You do know what 386 enhanced is right? The [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file contains information specific to running Windows in 386-enhanced mode, including information used for virtual-memory page swapping. As far as you wondering about my machine DCMonkey, I triple boot XP Professional SP3 (32 Bit), Windows 7 Ultimate RC (32 bit), and Server 2008 Standard SP2 (64 bit).

     

    I find it hard to believe that the kernel is still honouring these settings, and a quick google search for that Virtual Memory one you call it suggests that I am right.

    Have you any evidence that these swtiches are still processed by the kernel?

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    Wookie said:
    DCMonkey said:
    *snip*

    This new generation has me worried!!! If I don't write a swapfile key like say maybe this one ---> ConservativeSwapFileUsage=1 under 386enh in sys.ini then how else am I gonna keep more of the kernel in RAM ?? Superfetch you say?? That may well be, but I am from the old school where we learned everything ourselves and didn't go to a $50K a yr. college to learn it. I like TRIED and TRUE methods.You do know what 386 enhanced is right? The [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file contains information specific to running Windows in 386-enhanced mode, including information used for virtual-memory page swapping. As far as you wondering about my machine DCMonkey, I triple boot XP Professional SP3 (32 Bit), Windows 7 Ultimate RC (32 bit), and Server 2008 Standard SP2 (64 bit).

     

    Man you're full of yourself. Try learning about how versions of Windows that came out this millenium work before coming here and spewing your old-timer wisdom.

    Yeah I have a vague recollection of what 386enh was for **10 years ago**. I also remember dicking around with config.sys and autoexec.bat and trying to get drivers to load above 640k. It doesn't mean those techniques apply to a modern NT based OS.

  • User profile image
    Wookie

    KevinB said:
    Wookie said:
    *snip*

    I find it hard to believe that the kernel is still honouring these settings, and a quick google search for that Virtual Memory one you call it suggests that I am right.

    Have you any evidence that these swtiches are still processed by the kernel?

    Of course the kernel proccesses it.  You think the kernel is just going to ignore it?
    Wow!!! Books and hands on experience is two different things I tell ya. You probably don't even know that no version of windows sets your L2 Cache either. It has to be set by hand. I am setting up a student tech. club soon. I don't know where you are but you will be more than welcome to join.

  • User profile image
    Wookie

    DCMonkey said:
    Wookie said:
    *snip*

    Man you're full of yourself. Try learning about how versions of Windows that came out this millenium work before coming here and spewing your old-timer wisdom.

    Yeah I have a vague recollection of what 386enh was for **10 years ago**. I also remember dicking around with config.sys and autoexec.bat and trying to get drivers to load above 640k. It doesn't mean those techniques apply to a modern NT based OS.

    I am full of myself? You obviously don't pay attention to OS architecture very much. The core kernel in NT hasn't changed all that much in case you haven't noticed, and  let me see... I am pretty sure that XP Professional and Server 2008 were both introduced in "THIS MILLENIUM". I asked if anyone knew a workaround for a problem. Not for a bunch of BS from some kid who's obviously offended because he doesn't know as much as he thought. If you're not part of the solution, don't become part of the problem.

    " If a key doesn't exist - write it!! " David Andrews

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    Wookie said:
    DCMonkey said:
    *snip*

    I am full of myself? You obviously don't pay attention to OS architecture very much. The core kernel in NT hasn't changed all that much in case you haven't noticed, and  let me see... I am pretty sure that XP Professional and Server 2008 were both introduced in "THIS MILLENIUM". I asked if anyone knew a workaround for a problem. Not for a bunch of BS from some kid who's obviously offended because he doesn't know as much as he thought. If you're not part of the solution, don't become part of the problem.

    " If a key doesn't exist - write it!! " David Andrews

    Oh you got me. All three of your impressive phalanx of OSen are versions that came out this millenium. You still seem to be missing the point that the settings your're trying to tweak are for a completely separate kernel and that the file they used to appear in only exists in NT based OSs for backwards compatibility with apps for the old kernel based OS line. If you were trying to add a setting for that reason I might sympathise and overlook the chip on your shoulder, but you come off like one of those guys that learned some arcane tweak back in 92 (before the first EP) and and thinks he's been God's gift to IT ever since as he applies it cargo cultishly to each successive OS.

    You might try to explain what you are trying to accomplish (note: adding a setting to "sys.ini" is not what you are trying to accomplish. You are trying to optimize your system performance), and maybe someone here will tell you what the proper way to do that on an NT based OS is. Or more likely a bunch of us will tell you it's not really necessary anymore.

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    Wookie said:
    KevinB said:
    *snip*

    Of course the kernel proccesses it.  You think the kernel is just going to ignore it?
    Wow!!! Books and hands on experience is two different things I tell ya. You probably don't even know that no version of windows sets your L2 Cache either. It has to be set by hand. I am setting up a student tech. club soon. I don't know where you are but you will be more than welcome to join.

    Are you talking about SecondLevelDataCache? The setting that doesn't even apply to Pentium II or newer? The setting that when set to 0 will get it's value from the HAL and then set to a default if that fails?

    I weep for those students.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Where are you guys getting sysedit from? It doesn't exist on my installation of Windows 7. Are you using the 32 bit version (I use 64 bit, which has no compatibility with 16 bit apps so it doesn't really need sysedit)?

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    Sven Groot said:

    Where are you guys getting sysedit from? It doesn't exist on my installation of Windows 7. Are you using the 32 bit version (I use 64 bit, which has no compatibility with 16 bit apps so it doesn't really need sysedit)?

    Yeah, it's a 16 bit app.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    What you need to do is create a copy of system.ini and save it somewhere safe (I recommend in your Recycle Bin). Windows will pay as much attention to this as any other system.ini file. In fact, you can run around creating them everywhere. Hours of fun, I'm sure you'll agree!

  • User profile image
    stevo_

    Wow, this guys a dick hah, stick with windows 98se grandad..

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.