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Microsoft Access and the new Office 2013

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  • User profile image
    figuerres

    So am i reading the info right ?   Access is no longer a seperate DB using JET ?

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fp179914(v=office.15).aspx">http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fp179914(v=office.15).aspx

    says "In an on-premise environment, Access 2013 Preview apps are hosted by SharePoint 2013 Preview while the data is stored in SQL Server 2012. SharePoint 2013 Preview provides authentication, authorization, and security for Access 2013 Preview apps. The back-end tables, views, macros, and queries are stored in an SQL Server 2012 database."

    while i know that access gets a bad rap due to users creating bad apps and stuff but i also know that there have been some great small apps that would never have been done if the author had to get the data on the centeral IT servers.....  so in a way i guess access is now really gone. 

    RIP JET.

     and also:  so why did they not merge LightSwitch and Access into one authoring system ?? seems like they are almost going to duplicate many of the same functions and tasks and such.....

     

  • User profile image
    Craig_​Matthews

    Uhhmm...Can I still use Access at home without having an SQL server and Sharepoint server? Please tell me I'm reading that wrong and that I can. I really don't want to hear someone say that I can no longer use Access without an IT infrastructure because my grandmother doesn't need it.

  • User profile image
    felix9

    Just run my Access 2013 preview app.

    The first template in the New Document screen is Custom Web App, which might be what you are talking about here, but the second template is still Blank Desktop Database, which is an .accdb file, and .mdb file is also supported, so yes I think you can still use Access to build a standalone JET database.

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    JET has been dead in Access since 2010, maybe even 2007.

  • User profile image
    felix9

    why ? the ACE engine in 2007 is just a customized version of JET, AFAIK.

    http://blogs.office.com/b/microsoft-access/archive/2005/10/13/access-12-s-new-data-engine.aspx

  • User profile image
    astegmaier

    This is Andrew Stegmaier from the Access product team. I wanted to clarify some of the issues that you have raised.

    Access 2013 allows you to make two kinds of databases (1) Web Databases and (2) Desktop Databases.

    2013 Web Databases are published to a SharePoint 2013 site as a SharePoint App, and the data is stored on the back-end in SQL Server. These were the kinds of databases that you've been reading about in these linked articles. We're really excited about the potential of this new kind of database to make sharing, deployment, and creation easier than ever. Office 365 means that its easier than ever for people enjoy the benefits of SharePoint without expensive servers and IT staff.

    However, as Felix9 pointed out, Access 2013 supports Desktop Databases as well. These are the kinds of databases that could also be created in previous versions of Access, which by default store the data in the Jet database engine. (Just as before, these desktop databases also have the ability to connect to SQL for data storage, as well). Access is still a very useful product by itself with no Office 365 or SharePoint.

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    , astegmaier wrote

    This is Andrew Stegmaier from the Access product team. I wanted to clarify some of the issues that you have raised.

    Access 2013 allows you to make two kinds of databases (1) Web Databases and (2) Desktop Databases.

    2013 Web Databases are published to a SharePoint 2013 site as a SharePoint App, and the data is stored on the back-end in SQL Server. These were the kinds of databases that you've been reading about in these linked articles. We're really excited about the potential of this new kind of database to make sharing, deployment, and creation easier than ever. Office 365 means that its easier than ever for people enjoy the benefits of SharePoint without expensive servers and IT staff.

    However, as Felix9 pointed out, Access 2013 supports Desktop Databases as well. These are the kinds of databases that could also be created in previous versions of Access, which by default store the data in the Jet database engine. (Just as before, these desktop databases also have the ability to connect to SQL for data storage, as well). Access is still a very useful product by itself with no Office 365 or SharePoint.

    Andrew, thank you for the information, i may have read the one part and took it to mean more than it did.

    but i am also still wondering about the lightswitch Vs. Access Web question, it does seem like there is a possibly large area of "overlap" between the the two.

    when i first head about lightswitch it was interesting but what i found when i dug into it was not what i wanted.  classic Access was abe to do some really cool things for small fast apps "back in the day"  I sometimes wish i could drag some of the lightswitch stuff and some of the access stuff into one .net workspace and wind up with some of the better parts of each in one package!

     

  • User profile image
    Primetime21

    Hey Access Experts. Is there any tighter integration between Access, it's Jet Engine and SQL?? I guess what I am trying to ask is SQl 2012 more compatible?? Here is why I am asking. I converted a Access Db to a back end SQl 2008 Db, and there were alot workarounds to making it work effectivly in SQL. I guess one main thing is that the access Jet saves data instantly in a record when you enter data into any field and in SQL, it was updated after the whole recordset was updated. this cause some locking issues. Also, why don't you guys make the data types in access the exact same as in SQL to avoid those problems as well?? after my conversion to the SQl back end, troubleshooting all the quirks between the two was a nightmare!!

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