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Bass Bass Knows the way the wind is flowing.
  • Win Phone 7 development documents leaked?

    Minh said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    no OGL ES... but I guess if you're porting, then the graphics layer is the least of your worries Smiley

    Actually it is. If you wrote your game for pretty much any other smartphone, you used OpenGL ES. Does Microsoft expect everyone to port their entire game engine to XNA? Not going to happen.

  • Win Phone 7 development documents leaked?

    I guess that means no OpenGL ES.

  • What's the magical ​percentage..​.

    Harlequin said:
    figuerres said:
    *snip*

    Very good points. Sounds to me then that HTML/JS/CSS won't be Flash/Silverlight killers until they get hard "this is how it should look" into the HTML/CSS standards. Think it was Cameron Moll, showed during his WebDesignWorld 2009 presentation what the HTML guidelines look like, things like the <table> tag, the specs tell how it should work, but it actually has words in the HTML recommendations that it's up to the browser manufacturers how it should look. We can all see this clearly in things like <ul> unordered lists. They look different in ALL browsers in terms of spacing, bullet size, margins, paddings, etc.

    The success of HTML is a testament to it's simplicity, openness and usefulness.

  • What's the magical ​percentage..​.

    magicalclick said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    Not sure why I would want Silverlight to play ogg, but since Silverlight can use whatever codec, okey. I just want to play more silverlight games though. I don't care much about video part, although the streaming is nice.

    dupe

  • What's the magical ​percentage..​.

    magicalclick said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    Not sure why I would want Silverlight to play ogg, but since Silverlight can use whatever codec, okey. I just want to play more silverlight games though. I don't care much about video part, although the streaming is nice.

    Let's say you put Ogg Theora video on your website. And you want it to play HTML5 video.

     

    Say that person is using IE, IE does not support <video> at all, let alone Ogg Theora. It could then detect that the person can not play the video directly, and use Silverlight to load the video. Hence you can, using the same <video> tags, support people who do not have browsers that support <video>.

     

    AFIAK this is not currently possible though, because there is no .NET Theora codec. And I would be scared to see it's CPU usage if it was ever made. You can't use unsafe code in Silverlight to try to accelerate vector operations. People complain enough about highly optimized C/Assembly software codecs not using the GPU. So that would be a problem with this approach.

     

    I figure Chrome Frame is the best option at this point for supporting IE users and still using Theora. And as I said, with the QuickTime codec for Safari, you have what is 100% desktop browser penetration with Theora. Well no, maybe 99.9%. Links2 is not supported. Sad

  • Zune HD  Q&A

    It will be interesting if WinMob 7 supports OpenGL ES. It's become something like a standard on mobile devices at this point, and it would make it easier for games to be ported over from iPhone or Android.

     

    What also would be interesting would be XNA frontend, OpenGL ES backend. If they ever open source that, it could trivially be ported to Mac OS X or Linux too. Smiley

  • What's the magical ​percentage..​.

    magicalclick said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    What I mean is, all my videos are points to Flash anyway. I don't have the proper code ofc.

    Yeah, and if you wrap your Flash loading code with <video> tags, the videos will display in HTML5 video instead if it is supported. But if it's not, it will just display the Flash video.

     

    Actually Silverlight might have an advantage here in that it has a pluggable codec system starting with Silverlight 3. So potentially someone could write an Ogg Theora codec for Silverlight (but in managed code, so it might be slow). There already exists an Ogg Vorbis (audio only) codec written in 100% C#, and it works in Silverlight now too. 

     

    Or Microsoft could add Ogg Theora support natively. Smiley Wink Smiley  But seriously, that could make it the "video plugin" of choice in a lot of applications, but probably not YouTube.

  • What's the magical ​percentage..​.

    magicalclick said:

    Stupid thought, but as dev, I would probably use <video>flash</video> and if(!HTML5) then <div>flash</div>.

    You don't even have to do that. Using JavaScript, it's possible to just have a <video> and automatically degrade to Flash when <video> doesn't work. Thus your HTML can be extremely clean.


    Even without JS, anything you but in-between a <video></video> tag will be displayed if <video> fails. Even in IE. If <video> works, it is ignored. So <video src="/path/to/video.mp4">[flash loader here]</video> will work as expected.

  • Unit testing question

    Learn about ASP.NET MVC, and try to emulate a similar archecture with your VB6 project (not impossible). You will have something that is both much cleaner to work on, and much much much much easier to unit test. And you will learn about a pretty cool development framework at the same time.

  • What's the magical ​percentage..​.

    figuerres said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    Bass: the problem is that the only "standard" thing is the tag "<video ...>"

     

    so the web developer / programmer is left with having to possibly maintain multiple video files and multiple page versions to make it work.

    thus it's not really a "standard"

    even within the html5 side the developer is left having to need to know which browsers will play which video formats.

     

    for a true "standard" the server could have one file format - say ogg for example

    and any browser that supports html5 would play the .ogg file.

     

    Well that was originally the plan, but Apple was against it.