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Discussions

Bass Bass Knows the way the wind is flowing.
  • Australian ISP wins against film studios claiming copyright infringment

    elmer said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*

    Yes, I agree with most of that, and I’m certainly not arguing a case for censorship or trying to be an apologist for the Govt/Conroy.

     

    However, many of the claims made about the proposal, and the subsequent perceptions held, are based on misinformation, and I believe that the only way you can wage an effective campaign against something, is if you know he facts and base your arguments on them.

     

    The only point I would make is that the proposed mandatory filters don't actually set out to make "morality" judgments, and only propose to filter "illegal" material... i.e. stuff that you would otherwise be arrested and penalised for if found in possession of.

     

    However, as you say, the effectiveness is so questionable, that it's hard to see how it's going to be anything more than an appeasement of the wowser groups... and it's such a slippery slope to be stepping on to, that you really have to ask if we should be going there at all.

    I don't personally support any form of prior restraint on speech, regardless of it's legal status.

  • Microsoft's creative destruction

    Ray7 said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    I see your point, but what if you have your head in your sand to such an extent you believe you're invincible? A lot of the problems we're seeing here is because Microsoft could not (and still doesn't) see Apple as competition.

     

     

    These kinds of things happened before. IBM/Apple went through such phases. You eventually lay off virtually all of middle management, some of upper management, and many of the lower end peons who aren't doing anything really useful. You kill any long standing unprofitable projects.

     

    The organization gets a lot smaller and more focused, the people employed are mostly directly focused on the core business, the management structure is flattened and bureaucracy is largely eliminated. Then you start hiring more self motivated people as you get back on your feet, but bureaucracy starts creeping in again inevitably. Then you just repeat the cycle if it gets bad enough.

     

    If you don't do this, you will eventually go bankrupt in a competitive market. Unless of course, it's not a competitive market. Like you are a government agency with a steady revenue stream of tax dollars. Or you are a big business with a very stable business model. Then you just stay in business without having to worry about organizational efficiency. For the case of Microsoft, if their steady revenue stream starts loosing pressure, they will also start doing these things (as they have in the past year or so, due to declining revenues). They find no shame in trimming the hedges, which leads to believe they are better run then you think.

  • Microsoft's creative destruction

    ManipUni said:

    I agree with W3bbo. Microsoft needs to start up small organisations and tell them, here is some cash, if you can make it profitable you can keep a stake. If you cannot then we destroy it and start again after a few years. Even if 90% of the cash you throw at this might be wasted, the 10% will easily pay for it.

     

    In other words Microsoft as one company = bad. Microsoft as the overlord of tons of micro-companies = good.

    Competition is such an important thing for the health of a organization that China (which is still largely Communist, believe it or not) competes with itself. In that there will be multiple government agencies producing a single kind of product on purpose. So basically they are doing what W3bbo said, on a massive scale.

  • Microsoft's creative destruction

    Ray7 said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    I don't think the competition is going to help. This is a culture problem.

     

    Competition kills organizational problems. It's the business equivalent of natural selection.

  • FOSDEM this weekend

    TommyCarlier said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    No, I can only go on Sunday, for the Mono-track. I think it's pretty cool that such a large event can be organized without charging people.

    That's a shame. There will apperently be 65 types of beer available.

     

    I think it's pretty cool that such a large event can be organized without charging people.

     

    FOSDEM has some pretty wealthy sponsors.

  • Microsoft's creative destruction

    I think Microsoft will become more innovative once they have some real competition and actually have to fight hard for green balance sheets. They resemble to me a for-profit government agency. Which basically means public sector culture, with private sector job security. Perplexed

  • Sexy Cloud Idea

    Why would someone standardize on Silverlight? Why not Java, or Objective-C, or even HTML? I know this is Channel 9 and most people have an innate love affair with anything Microsoft or .NET related, but how would you sell this to the general public / general developers?

  • Sexy Cloud Idea

    JoshRoss said:

    I would like to see a slimed down version of windows that just ran Silverlight apps.  Having this real restriction would force people to develop new solutions to existing problems.  In the first year I would release a trial version of the OS that would function a year from its initial installation date.  After that it would require activation.  I would also subsidize the sale of apps for the first 100,000.  For every five apps that was sold, I would pay the developer as if they sold six.  

     

    I like the idea of sandboxing the apps within the OS.  It's kind of like type-safty.

     

    To me the open questions are how do you incentivize the consumer and also the developer.  I think the model that Bing uses, e.g. CashBack, would work well, if you switch developer with merchant.

    Why wait for Microsoft to never make this?

    You could make this yourself using a Linux kernel, and Moonlight.

  • FOSDEM this weekend

    Looks like a lot of the core Mono team is going to be there. You are very lucky you live so close, I would love to go to something like that. Are you going to go to the "Free As in Beer" event on Friday?

  • Countdown to VS2010 RTM

    I got Windows 7 Ultimate for free by attending a similar event. There was also free food. Not bad.