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Discussions

Kental2 Kental2
  • Improving the development process at a small startup

    Slightly off topic from your original question Bas, but I'd be interested if anyone here has any experience or knowledge with any materials or books that try to help with the art of requirements gathering.  In my shop, the guy who does all of the dealing with customers was on vacation for 3 weeks a couple months ago, so I had to take over the requirements gathering side of things, and I have to tell you: I've never in my life wanted to harm another human being more than these clients/customers.

    90% of the time all I could get were vague one word answers or "I just want it to look like this site over here" or "What we have now is fine, just re-skin it" and the like.  Then we'd show them something and we'd get "This isn't at all what we had in mind, where is X, Y and Z?"  It's not necessarily their fault, they aren't developers, they don't understand what we need, but it's virtually impossible to find the right phrasing to ask the client what they actually want to see at the end of the day.

    </rant>

  • Amazon AWS

    @kettch: My favorite is when I was looking to buy bulk compressed air, and for fun I was looking at some reviews.  "The can gets cold after spraying for more than a second or two.  3 stars unless they can fix this problem."

    I try to take all reviews I read with a grain of salt.  I also generally ignore 5 stars and 1 stars since they're (not always, but frequently) full of zealots on one end or the other.

  • Amazon AWS

    Wow, just goes to show you your mileage may vary in virtually everything in life.  I love Amazon.  Their prices are usually excellent, the reviews beat the pants off of consumer reports typically because it's real people (have to get a good sample set though, admittedly; I wouldn't trust reviews from 2 people).  And on the two occasions I can ever remember having a problem with something not being delivered or coming in broken, they overnighted me a new package.

    It appeals to my laziness and not having to walk in a store :P

    Edited to fix typo.

  • What is the most mundane task you have had to do as a programmer?

    , magicalclick wrote

    I think the most challenging and mundane task is to be forced have less than 10 code branches, aka, less than 10 conditions and loop combined. Otherwise I have to factor the code, which is extremely challenging when the refactored code makes little sense by itself. I can ask for waiver, but, that will become an overhead of all future report. Errrk.

    This, kinda.  I hate when new code standards are implemented and I have to fix a defect in legacy code, which doesn't conform to the new standards.  So instead of making a one line fix, I have to refactor an entire critical class and all of its unit tests since the code wasn't compliant in the first place.

  • Best wishes for Microsoft in 2014

    It's funny, it used to be that I'd have to do my sites in Chrome and Firefox and then hack to get IE to work.  These days, I work in Chrome and IE and have to hack to get Firefox to work.  Firefox is an absolute pitiful mess.  I don't know what they're doing but they feel like they've regressed to where IE8 or so is/was.

  • Holy crap, Stack Racking is no more!

    @ScanIAm: While I whole-heartedly agree with the sentiment, unfortunately too many times the metrics are things like "number of lines of code written" or "number of unit tests developed."  It's hard to find a manager that actually understands what metrics matter, in my opinion.  Granted, I'll admit that for someone as big as Microsoft I'm sure that's something less of a problem.

    As a manager, I value things like "Do I have to fail code reviews for the same things repeatedly" or "Do they go out and try to figure things out for themselves without having to have their hands held all the time, while still coming to ask for help when they've exhausted all avenues" and similar things.  The problem is those things aren't really easy to document and could be seen as subjective.  Objective measures usually mean some measure of quantity, and that almost always spells disaster.

  • Windows Desktop

    I think there's a little too much 'Minority Report' thinking when it comes to touch interfaces.  I think of touch as an interface designed to enhance some experiences, not meant to replace the entire experience altogether.  And in some cases, at least for me, I honestly don't think I'll ever be able to use touch, like as a replacement for the keyboard.  Me + Tablet "Touch" Keyboards == immense pain.

  • [Updated Demo] The Proof is in the Pudding: Here is my Fast TreeListView

    @aL3891: At the risk of being rude to androidi, he apparently has unbelievably sensitive eyes.  He's been complaining about IE since ... I dunno, IE9?  I've never seen a problem, but I'm certainly not going to call the guy a liar because he is more sensitive to some issues than I am.

  • Nokia 2520 vs iPad Air

    @ScanIAm: Frankly, I wish  I knew as well.  A couple of my friends keep going out and buying every single latest iPhone they release, even though it's like the same phone repackaged with a new version number almost every time.  It's unbelievable to me.  I suppose it's fair to say their marketing is amazing, but I don't understand how.  I saw this iPhone commercial in the theater the other day:

    http://www.youtube.com/embed/xYsSiaBZmRk

    If that's great marketing I think I'm completely out of touch.  Maybe it's like abstract art; it's only beautiful if you want to sound smart to someone else.

    Edit: Yes, I know we're talking about the iPad but... well, I've had trouble seeing the difference other than the size.

  • The cut-price Tablet market

    @TheJoe: Sorry, I'm a bit out of touch in cigarette pricing department Tongue Out  I don't smoke myself.