Jonathan Carter

Back to Profile: LostInTangent

Comments

  • 10-4 Episode 8: Pure Client-Side Development with ASP.NET AJAX 4.0

    AjaxRes.js is actually an artifact of the internal builds that I was using for the video Smiley If you grab the latest bits off of Codeplex, you won't need it.

  • 10-4 Episode 15: Model-First Development with the Entity Framework 4.0

    Sounds like what you want it to use Dynamics as your data store/platform, and then place the Entity Framework over it so that you can program against its dynamic entities. If so, the guys over at ADX Studio (http://www.adxstudio.com/) are working on something that handles this very nicely.

  • 10-4 Episode 15: Model-First Development with the Entity Framework 4.0

    I'll definitely be digging into the code much more moving forward. This episode was just an initial introduction to the high level changes coming. I'll make sure to provide plenty of good detail/usage examples Smiley

  • 10-4 Episode 15: Model-First Development with the Entity Framework 4.0

    Thanks for the heads up bertnz. The ORM space certainly has lots of great options.

  • 10-4 Episode 15: Model-First Development with the Entity Framework 4.0

    LINQ To SQL is getting quit a few improvements in the .NET 4 timeframe. You can see a pretty comprehensive list here: http://damieng.com/blog/2009/06/01/linq-to-sql-changes-in-net-40

    As far as the Entity Framework being the preferred option for data access moving forward, yes, that is the case.

  • 10-4 Episode 14: Sentient DSLs

    haha very well played Smiley
  • 10-4 Episode 11: Bi-​Directional Routing with ASP.NET WebForms 4.0

    I would go with the unique string approach. Since part of the whole objective is to provide more meaningful URLs to end users, integer/guid identifiers don't really provide them any value. That doesn't mean that you won't still need to do something along the lines of "Products/1" in situations were that makes sense. You might have resources that don't legitimately have a unique value other than an ID. For SEO purposes having a descriptive value in the URL certainly helps as well. "Products/Cups" is capable of being spidered as a resource on "cups" whereas "Products/45" isn't. Will that make a huge difference? Maybe not, but every little bit helps Smiley

    There is no need to get religious on either approach, it all just comes down to which approach serves the needs of your application the best. Since routing is so extensible, you should have fun building the sitemap you want. There is soooo much more to it then what I showed in this demo since this episode was meant only to show how routing and webforms can work together. General purpose routing has plenty of awesome little features.

    I doubt there will be a 10-4 episode on ASP.NET Routing specifically since it isn't a feature in .NET Framework 4.0, but I could throw together some ad-hoc screencasts and plop them on my blog (http://www.lostintangent.com) or C9.

    Keep these great questions coming guys, I seriously love the 10-4 community Smiley
  • 10-4 Episode 11: Bi-​Directional Routing with ASP.NET WebForms 4.0

    That is one of the first questions that always comes up after seeing ASP.NET Routing Smiley As of right now the only way to configure your routes is through code. That said, I'm a firm believer that a good API is the perfect foundation for layering additional forms of expression (i.e. loading routes from a config file or DB). There are a couple prototypes floating around that pull your route definitions from config that I'd be more than happy to share with you.

    As far as new rendering of controls, I'll deifnitely try to fit this in later episodes. Funny enough I actually showed off a very subtle change to the ListView control in this episode but I didn't call it out. You no longer have to have a PlaceHolderTemplate if your ItemTemplate's contents are truly seperate markup (i.e. not <li>'s within a <ul> for instance).

    Feel free to email me (joncart at microsoft dot com) and I can share some additional info in the meantine.
  • 10-4 Episode 8: Pure Client-Side Development with ASP.NET AJAX 4.0

    That's a good question. Firstly, it's important to point out that almost that entire demo could have been done imperatively, without adding anything to the HTML unneccesarily. The declarative command bubbling (sys:command) is a feature I can choose to use, but I can achieve the exact same thing strictly in JavaScript. The same goes for the conditional attributes I used (class:odd).

    While ASP.NET AJAX provides a lot of functionality in terms of working with it declaratively (as some folks like), it was developed with the mindset of using it completely unobtrusively. That said, the data templates are somewhat of a gray area. Defining the template is arguably much easier (for some) to do in HTML as opposed to within JavaScript (as other libraries do). That said, it does impose a foreign component to the HTML that isn't actually valid content (i.e. the binding expressions).

    If you don't like the approach of defining your templates and bindings within the markup, you can still do that in JavaScript as well. The creation of the DataView class simply requires an element that it can bind to and repeat, so there is no reason why that element couldn't be constructed using DOM methods imperatively, as opposed to retreiving it from the actual DOM as I did in the demo.

    I'll put together a demo that does this and post it later.

  • 10-4 Episode 8: Pure Client-Side Development with ASP.NET AJAX 4.0

    To clarify one thing about the demo I showed off in the video...the DataView control, bindings, command bubbling, and ADO.NET Data Services integration are currently available on Codeplex, but the change tracking functionality and the ability to save changes back to the service aren't. That behavior will be included in the next Codeplex preview, along with much more.