Entries:
Comments:
Posts:

Loading User Information from Channel 9

Something went wrong getting user information from Channel 9

Latest Achievement:

Loading User Information from MSDN

Something went wrong getting user information from MSDN

Visual Studio Achievements

Latest Achievement:

Loading Visual Studio Achievements

Something went wrong getting the Visual Studio Achievements

Comments

WinInsider WinInsider Mike, MCAD
  • Suzanne Cook - Developing the CLR, Part II

    Beer28 wrote:

    So native code is also good because it's an added layer of protection against reverse engineering.


    Beer28 raises very important point. Many companies want to protect their intellectual property (resources and time) that they put into making a software product, and it is a big issue, knowing that someone can take .NET DLL or EXE and quite easily decompile. I know there are tools that "obfuscate" the MSIL, but do not come close to ASM native image.

    I am not with the latest buzz, but I would hope that next version of VS 2005 would have much better NGEN that not only could put .NET Native Image into GAC, but also produce standalone app, that could only be run on target platform that has compatible .NET libraries installed.

  • Scott Currie - Demo of Quake on .NET

    Why would there be performance hit on Pentium 4, but no performance hit on Pentium 3 or Centrino for C++ in CLR?

    One would think that it would be the other way around.

    "What is the deal with performance? Is C++.NET the best?"


    Yes it is!

  • Jim Allchin - The Longhorn Update

    Porting back Avalon to Windows XP/2003 is misguided attempt.  Even though would be "available" for download, few would choose to download and install it.  And thus, it would only be guaranteed that Longhorn users can run Avalon applications.  For example look at .NET Framework 1.0/1.1, few average users have it on their computers, and it has been "available" for few years now.

    Besides, Avalon would need powerful machine, and graphics capabilities, which most XP machines (including those bought in 2001 when XP came out) do not have the muscle to make Avalon shine.

    Indigo on XP/2003 is good idea, as a common communication infrastructure across all windows machines, but Avalon on XP/2003, big mistake.  It will only add to complexity and consume time and resources from other more important developments.

    I am questioning how many people would benefit from Avalon on Windows XP?  Yes, there maybe some now saying “cool”, but two years from now – hardware will change, and many probably will get new PC with Longhorn in the box.

    As for Avalon on Server (2003), it is not that essential. Probably if you got Server 2003, one is using not for the esthetic looks, but rather for hosting varies services.  If someone wants full power of Avalon (mostly power-users) then they would get Longhorn.

    Microsoft move forward, not backward.

  • Don Box - Tour of Indigo Team

    Any word whether Indigo will ship with .NET 2.0?

    For all fans of Don Box here is another video. – the “long hairstyle” version Smiley
  • Iain McDonald - What's the biggest suprise that will come out of Microsoft in the next year or two?

    Hi Iain,

    I am looking forward to updating all of my home computers (both new and old) to SP2 as soon I can get my hands on it. Although I am concern how well will SP2 perform on older computers that lay on the borderline of system requirements? (E.g. 300MHz, 128MB)

    I know that SP2 is mostly about security, but have there been tests/efforts done that show improvements/effects to... (tests on both new and old computers)

    - Faster boot time
    - Better CPU utilization
    - Smaller memory footprint

    I hope that SP2 will not slowdown already slow and low on resources computer.

    In any case SP2 is a must have.

    cheers,

    Mike M
    WinInsider.com

  • Kang Su Gatlin - The power of C++ in the managed code world

    Another advantage of MC++/CLR that Kang mention in another video is optimization that C++ team made on CLR compiled code.  Thus, it should not be surprising to see MC++ outperform equivalent C# code (or VB.NET for that manner).

  • Kang Su Gatlin - What's the advantage to writing managed code in Visual C++?

    Kang,

    I have enormous appreciation for MC++.  The ability to bridge managed and unmanaged code is so powerful.  It takes a lot of smarts to allow for such seamless Interoperability and optimization work that VC++ team has made, with each product release.  Congratulations!

    My wish would only be if MC++ could be possible on the .NET Compact Framework.  As on the desktop, the embedded type devices (Windows CE base) have system level features only exposed thru native API.  P/Invoke is too limiting and primitive comparing to the power and flexibility of MC++.

    Is it feasible to have MC++ on Compact Framework in the near future? (I am sure that VC++ team does not shy away from a challenge)

    Mike M
    WinInsider.com
    Microsoftonian

  • Anders Hejlsberg - Tour through computing industry history at the Microsoft Museum

    I found one more video just posted on MSDN with Anders Hejlsberg.

    Anders talks about Nullable types, With keyword, ValueType boxing and unboxing, and default method parameters.

    UPDATED: MS has removed the video, but I still managed to trackdown the video download.

  • Mike Hall - Why are there so many operating systems?

    To download the video, right mouse click on this link and select "Save Target As..."

    Note: This will work in IE only.

    UPDATED: forget what I said above, it apears that this method seems to be blocked.
  • Mike Hall - Windows CE and Windows Embedded Lab Tour

    I am looking for something that I would not have to build the casing for. Final device specs...

    • 300+MHz
    • 500MB HD
    • Serial port
    • Audio in/out
    • Ethernet
    • Build in modem
    • 128 MB of RAM would do

    If the above are too specific for a generic Windows CE device that has casing, than I may settle for a reference board.  Thus how would one build casing for reference board of a final device?  In the video there were two reference boards (one from company called Intrinsic).  How did the reference boards got their casing?  Did the companies supplied the casing for these reference boards?

    Mike M