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Discussions

felix9 felix9 the cat that walked by itself
  • [TOPIC SUGGESTION] Wolfram Schulte, TSE, CloudBuild, and more

    @Charles:nice :) thanks :)

    by the way, a little bit more about this here https://careers.microsoft.com/jobdetails.aspx?jid=173098&pp=VR

    We are leading the effort to create a modern build engine - fast, reliable, scalable, cloud-based, and yet closely aligned with Microsoft's existing build tooling. We precisely analyze dependencies between build tasks, enabling distribution and caching at a fine-grained level. We are aiming to expand the target platforms from Windows to OSX and Linux. The modern build engine will ship as part of Visual Studio, and will be made available as a service in VSO: All engineers inside and outside of Microsoft will be able to kick off distributed and cached builds from their personal development environments, benefitting from the power of the cloud to get lightning fast build results.

  • [TOPIC SUGGESTION] Wolfram Schulte, TSE, CloudBuild, and more

    Wolfram Schulte is giving public talks like this http://www.pm.inf.ethz.ch/Talks

    Software Engineering Services at Scale
    Dr. Wolfram Schulte, Microsoft Research, Redmond
    Monday, March 16, 14:00, CAB G61

    Abstract:
    To be successful in today's fast-paced software development environment it is essential to have a high engineering agility, that is minimize the time from software requirements being defined to having the customer consume the feature. The Tools for Software Engineers team, which is chartered to improve Microsoft's engineering velocity, addresses this by providing Software Engineering Services in the cloud. Examples are code review, build, test, static analysis, operational and engineering analytics. In this talk our main focus will be CloudBuild. Its objective is to shorten the continuous integration cycle time, which is the minimum time required for a typical source code change to move from changed to compiled and unit tested binary. CloudBuild is currently used by thousands of engineers. It runs tens of thousands of builds and millions of tests per day. CloudBuild has continuously shown 4-10X speed improvements compared to Microsoft traditional build systems, giving engineers more opportunities to try alternate design and provide confidence in their check-ins. But building such a distributed system is not without its challenges, the CloudBuild system has multiple dependencies from version control via package management to drop service; it has requirements for build machine preparation, including location aware enlistment creation; it requires algorithms for online task scheduling in the presence of build caches; it has mechanism for checking for incrementality in builds and tests; it uses lightweight process isolation to detect runtime errors against static build specifications. And of course it has all the usual requirements for failure tolerance of distributed systems. Today it empowers engineers in Microsoft, tomorrow it will hopefully empower Microsoft's tooling customers. This talk will give an overview of TSE, and a glimpse of the journey from the desktop and lab to the cloud, its immense opportunities but also its new service challenges.

    Bio:
    Wolfram Schulte is a partner group software engineering manager in Microsoft's Developer Division, Redmond, USA, where he founded in 2012 the Tools for Software Engineers (TSE) team. Its mission is to improve Microsoft's engineering velocity. TSE does so by building developer services using Cloud technologies. Before Wolfram ventured into product groups, Wolfram lead the Research in Software Engineering (RiSE) group, at Microsoft Research (MSR).
    His research interests include
    software development tools, ranging from build, via automatic test to deployment,
    software engineering analytics, ranging from collecting data to prediction,
    programming languages, ranging from language design to runtimes.
    Before joining MSR in 1999, Wolfram worked at the University of Ulm (1993-1999, habilitation), at sd&m, a German software company (1992-1993), and at the Technical University Berlin (1987-1992, PhD).

    So I think his team is not in "hush-hush" mode, right ? his recent work and team is very interesting, I hope C9 can have him as guest more (a)

  • Hololens ideas.

    , felix9 wrote

    most of the holograms I saw are just 3d models, which are virtual objects, I think its very difficult to capture a real life object, like a human, as a hidef hologram, like a video camera.

    at the stage they showed a hologram of Terry Myerson, I dont know if thats 'recorded' from the real Terry, or just a 3d model, can anyone tell ??

    well, I can answer this now, it is real video recording of Terry Myerson:

    see this https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=5275693&authType=name&authToken=WRW3

    Basically, we are building a free-viewpoint video capture and playback system

    This shot was captured/processed/encoded using software from our project. This is a true 3D video (i.e. Terry is in full 3D... you can walk around).

  • more on HoloLens API: ​Windows.​Mirage.​Hologram​Framework

    here is a patent application named "MIXED REALITY HOLOGRAPHIC OBJECT DEVELOPMENT"

    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2014/0049559.html
    https://www.google.com/patents/US20140049559

  • new info around Midori team

    @Charles: actually, there are plenty of interesting projects from MSR once awhile, if C9 need topics suggestions I can post them whenever I see one.

  • new info around Midori team

    @Charles: that'll be super awesome ! :)

    always a great pleasure to see those great researchers on C9 ! Galen Hunt has some great stuff to share every time, and David, oh so many years :P

    (Lightbulb hmm......)

  • new info around Midori team

    well, more news today:

    first, Midori team member Mircea Trofin is now working at Google
    https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4282624&authType=name&authToken=r7R0

    and, David Tarditi just updated his LinkedIn with many information
    https://www.linkedin.com/pub/david-tarditi/1/8a7/717

    he is back working at Microsoft Research "OS Technologies Group" since Feb 2015

    I am leading the Autobahn project with Galen Hunt. A problem with Singularity and Midori was that existing code had to be manually rewritten at great expense in C#. The goal of the Autobahn project is to automatically convert existing C and C++ code to type-safe code, thereby providing a fast road to the future where systems are free of the security and reliability problems that affect C and C++ programs.

    and previously, he was in OSG from Dec 2014 to Feb 2015,

    previously, he was in DevDiv from Aug 2014 to Nov 2014

    The System C# project was moved from the Operating Systems Group to Developer Division, ostensibly to productize the effort. I was development manager for the Systems Programming Platform Group, which was part of the Systems Programming Group. This was a short-lived effort, unfortunately.

    and previously, he was in OSG from Nov 2013 to Aug 2014

    led the System C# project. The goal of System C# was to let you write systems code in C#. It was based on our experience writing systems software in C# in Midori, with the goal of bringing the programming technology we developed in Midori back to Windows.

    some interesting history there.

  • more on HoloLens API: ​Windows.​Mirage.​Hologram​Framework

    , WinHUGR wrote

    @felix9: you mention a simulator, which brings up the interesting question of what form a simulator for developing HoloLens applications might take on. Considering the many different sensors and the relationship of the real world 3d environment to a HoloLens application, I wonder what approach they will take with creating simulators of the device?  

    well, I think programmer doesn't need to work with those "many different sensors" directly, I guess HoloLens itself will hide those details for you, and act as just a "World Sensor", so what you get is just World and Person etc.

  • Windows 10 for Windows Phones

    1316 = 2 * 14 * 47, whatever that means.

    or maybe 13 = 15-2 ? 15-2-16 ?

  • C# 7.0 may bring some M# goodness

    well, C# is also used to write client side apps on the desktop or mobile devices, where performance is more related to memory usage and raw execution efficiency.

    also, C# has many good stuff like memory safety and type safety etc, which are also desirable for lower level programming, like device drivers, it'll be nice if C# can be used there.