nightski

Back to Profile: nightski

Comments

  • Soma, Carol Grojean, Jeff Beehler: Visual Studio 2008 RTM!!!

    Yea, in order to get it to work with IE7 in Vista you have to disable the popup blocker for the site.  It is very annoying.

    Also, since it is an ActiveX control it runs in IE7's "Protected Mode".  So it the download will end up being located in the virtualized hard drive space IE7 creates for security.  That is why you received the prompt about saving the file to temporary internet files.
  • Pat Brenner: New Updates to MFC in Visual Studio 2008

    Why are you even responding to SecretSoftware's comment...

    Anyways, it is kind of sad that these controls are quite a bit richer than what we get in the WPF world Smiley

    Thanks for the vid.

  • Steve Teixeira and Bill Dunlap: Visual C++ Today and Tomorrow

    Thanks for the link!
  • Steve Teixeira and Bill Dunlap: Visual C++ Today and Tomorrow

    7k+ new unmanaged APIs?  Awesome!  I have used a few but I had no idea there were that many.  Is there a place available that lists these new APIs (most or all of them)?

    Thanks.

  • WPF State of the Nation

    Nice video.  I'd love to see more on WPF, WCF & WF Smiley
  • Geeking Out in Barcelona

    Very fun video!  The participants were excellent but I also really liked the concepts discussed.  Its nice to just sit back sometimes and think about these sorts of issues.
  • Ric Merrifield - Microsoft gets down to business with Motion initiative

    Just out of curiosity - is this more of an isolated initiative within Microsoft where a single team performs analysis and determines where in this "map" Microsoft's products/architectures fit?  Or is it more of an initiative where program managers at Microsoft use this information as sort of a feed back loop to determine where they want their product to fit in the business landscape and where it should go in the next 3-5 years?

    It seems like this could be just as useful for Microsoft in determining the direction of their products as it is for the customers trying to find an overall IT strategy.
  • Mary Snapp: VP and Deputy General Counsel

    That is all fine and dandy Charles but just remember your audience is a technical one.  I agree, this video seemed out of place to me.

    But thanks for the great work you guys are doing.

  • The PDC05 Flair

    This seems like such a cool thing, but why name it flair??!?!  Anyone who has seen Office Space must think this = bad Smiley

    So do you want us to just express ourselves?  Or meet the bare minimum?
  • Hunter Hudson/Jon Pincus - On Spot the Bug and Code Quality, Part II

    Very interesting.  But it would have been nice if it wasn't such a one guy show Smiley

    Good job though.
  • Ian Huff - Using VSTS Performance Tools to Speed Up Your App (Part 2)

    Well,
    a Struct is still being allocated on the stack.  If you are declaring 1000000 items on the stack, it probably isn't a good idea.  This type of problem is better suited for a reference type.

    Especially if you are calling ProcessMyStruct(m) because then the entire struct will be copied since it is passed by value.

    However, the struct will work the same way the int did, as a struct is just a combination of other value types.

  • Ian Huff - Using VSTS Performance Tools to Speed Up Your App (Part 2)

    Well,
    You don't really "allocate" value types in the same sense that you allocate objects.  Value types are on the stack (Correction: unless they are boxed).

    In my experience there is very litte difference from declaring a value type before a loop and changing its value to declaring it right in the loop.

    Also, it depends on the optimizations the compiler performs.

    But an interesting experiment would be just to load up VS.NET and try it.

    DateTime Start = DateTime.Now;
    int blah = 5;
    for (int i = 0;i < 10000000;i++)
    {
       blah = i;
    }

    Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Subtract(Start));
    Start = DateTime.Now;

    for (int j = 0;j < 10000000;j++)
    {
       int blah2 = j;
    }

    Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Subtract(Start));

    BTW - the results of this are -

    00:00:00.0468750
    00:00:00.0156250

    which is very interesting because it shows the second version actually being faster than the first!

    I am by no means an expert (I have only a little assembly experience on hand).  So if anyone wants to prove me wrong please do so.  Oh, and this code is not perfect (I spent like 20 seconds writing it), so please don't be too hard on me Smiley