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Discussions

William Kempf wkempf
  • .NET framework source code can be yours!

    dahat wrote:
    
    stevo_ wrote:
    No way, slashdot finds way to complain about everything Microsoft does? thats fresh..


    Agreed... apparently in some minds there... reading the .NET Framework code could make you unemployable because you've been tainted and can never write another clean room implementation of something... and yet... reading Linux kernel apparently code does not do the same thing. Go fig.


    Scoble has to open his mouth as well, and my only thought is "why would a pundit with no knowledge about coding even bother to comment about this"?  http://scobleizer.com/2007/10/03/microsoft-open-sourcing-after-everyone-else/

    Microsoft didn't do this to be "open source", but to allow debugging.

  • .NET framework source code can be yours!

    stevo_ wrote:
    
    wkempf wrote:
    The ability to step through the code will definitely be useful.  However, this isn't as big of a deal as people are making out.  With Reflector we've had the ability to look at the "source" for a very long time.  Basically since the beginning.  This announcement gives us only 2 things... access to comments, which I'm sure have been cleaned up , and the ability to step through the code.  From a learning perspective, we basically already had the code.

    Again, I'm not trying to be a naysayer, because this announcement is useful, but I find it strange that people are reacting the way they are.


    Not really, reflector is great and all but doesn't always give the full picture..

    for one it doesn't fully reverse engineer perfectly, and of course cannot get any level of commenting as it isn't compiled.


    I mentioned the comments, but really, I don't expect anything that great out of them.  And Reflector does well enough that I don't think there's going to be much to gain from just reading the source code.  Sorry, I just can't get excited about that.  However, I can most certainly get excited by the debugging symbols being made available as well!

  • .NET framework source code can be yours!

    The ability to step through the code will definitely be useful.  However, this isn't as big of a deal as people are making out.  With Reflector we've had the ability to look at the "source" for a very long time.  Basically since the beginning.  This announcement gives us only 2 things... access to comments, which I'm sure have been cleaned up Smiley, and the ability to step through the code.  From a learning perspective, we basically already had the code.

    Again, I'm not trying to be a naysayer, because this announcement is useful, but I find it strange that people are reacting the way they are.

  • Vista SendTo

    TommyCarlier wrote:
    If you're using .NET, you can get the exact folder by calling Environment.GetFolderPath(SpecialFolder.SendTo);


    PS> [Environment]::GetFolderPath("SendTo")

    Powershell is your friend Wink

  • Microsoft Should Abandon Vista?

    prndll wrote:
    I'm not trying to ruffle anyone's feathers here. But if we're going to talk about what's stupid....
    I think it's stupid for people to make decisions about what os to use based souly on what MS will support and what they wont. The choice of os should be made on preferance and on need. Not everyone needs or has any desire for the biggest part of what Vista is. Some will get use of it but most wont. Most people will use it simply due to the fact that it's what was on the computer when it was bought. It was the same thing with XP.

    If I were to even suggest using something like 98se or 2000, the first response I would get is something about MS no longer supporting these os's.  98se is still viable. It's just not supported by MS. What does that mean anyway? I can't call MS for answers to problems I might have? lol! I don't need or want MS support anyway. They have a tendancy to make things worse with their kind of support. I will fix my own issues.

    I just simply choose not to use Vista. I need to see something worth while about it first. Before I even consider it. It's no differant from Windows Media Center Edition or Windows Home Server. Those two os's serve no purpous to me since other os's do all those same things. Any computer can be a server and they all handle various media. Dressing things up to look cool just doesn't mean the same thing as doing things right.



    How hypocritical.  *You* don't need/want support, so you assume no one should.  Your needs aren't mine.  If you don't need, of course you should base your decision on that.  Laughing at other people who say they need it is just wrong.

  • Vista Start Menu

    tgraupmann wrote:
    I'm just surprised that the single point to which all windows users access windows couldn't have got more attention. The first thing I did was set the start menu back to classic mode. The new version is terrible. Patch needed...


    The start button got a lot of attention.  You just don't care for it, mostly it seems because you didn't give it a chance.

    The massive cascading menus of the old system really was clunky.  Even when navigating via mouse, I much prefer the new system with a single list.  If you don't, that's acceptable, but it's an opinion only, and Microsoft gave you a way to stick with the old style if you have that opinion.  So, no room for complaints on that.

    Organization... hasn't changed beyond the "styling" into a single list instead of cascading menus.

    The real kicker here, though, is the other improvements to the start button.  As others have pointed out, as much as I prefer the new menu interface... I hardly ever use it.  The search box makes launching applications SOOO much easier and quicker.

  • How do I get this to compile in Visual Studio 2005?

    Shining Arcanine wrote:

    short arr [len];


    There's your problem line.  You can't declare an array with a variable size.  'len' must be a constant.  Obviously, that's not what you want to do here, so your other option is to allocate the array on the heap (malloc/new/whatever).

    I'm surprised GCC accepts this.

  • Vista SP1 beta release today

    Misleading title.  SP1 was not released today.  A SP1 beta was/is/will be/whatever.  Still good news, but you should consider changing the title.

  • Extension Methods and LGPL?

    No reason to hide them.  As long as all you're doing is statically linking, the LGPL doesn't effect your code, and this includes extension methods, which are just syntactic sugar around a static method.

  • IE7 counting elephants at start up

    AdrianJMartin wrote:
    Counting elephants has revealled the

    SSVHelper Class

    as being the culprit!

    plenty of google hits say turn it off - none i found say what it is or what it does?



    Slows Startup Virtually Helper?
    System Slowdown Vital Helper?
    Start Slowly Virus Helper?


    Wink


    http://www.neuber.com/taskmanager/process/ssv.dll.html

    So this is not an IE problem.  It's also not a problem in any of Microsoft's code.  If you don't use Java applets, you probably can leave it turned off.