Dan Reed: On the ManyCore Future and Parallelism in the Sky

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The Discussion

  • User profile image
    Minh
    awesome video!
  • User profile image
    Charles
    Minh wrote:
    awesome video!


    Glad you enjoyed it! Thanks for watching.
    C
  • User profile image
    CPrest
    Great Video !

    not just welcome to microsoft (for us non MS employees).

    Welcome to channel 9 !

    Cool
  • User profile image
    JoshRoss
    What is this dry-ah thing? Or at the very least, how do you spell it?
  • User profile image
    Charles
    JoshRoss wrote:
    What is this dry-ah thing? Or at the very least, how do you spell it?


    "Dryad is an infrastructure which allows a programmer to use the resources of a computer cluster or a data center for running data-parallel programs. A Dryad programmer can use thousands of machines, each of them with multiple processors or cores, without knowing anything about concurrent programming."
  • User profile image
    staceyw
    Charles wrote:
    
    JoshRoss wrote:
    What is this dry-ah thing? Or at the very least, how do you spell it?


    "Dryad is an infrastructure which allows a programmer to use the resources of a computer cluster or a data center for running data-parallel programs. A Dryad programmer can use thousands of machines, each of them with multiple processors or cores, without knowing anything about concurrent programming."


    Andrew Birrell is involved in that project - it must be good.  He also has an Automatic Mutual Exclusion (AME) project for alternative to explicit locks that looks interesting.
  • User profile image
    Charles
    staceyw wrote:
    
    Charles wrote:
    
    JoshRoss wrote:
    What is this dry-ah thing? Or at the very least, how do you spell it?


    "Dryad is an infrastructure which allows a programmer to use the resources of a computer cluster or a data center for running data-parallel programs. A Dryad programmer can use thousands of machines, each of them with multiple processors or cores, without knowing anything about concurrent programming."


    Andrew Birrell is involved in that project - it must be good.  He also has an Automatic Mutual Exclusion (AME) project for alternative to explicit locks that looks interesting.


    I sense a Going Deep with Andrew in future...

    Smiley
    C
  • User profile image
    staceyw
    Charles wrote:
    
    staceyw wrote:
    
    Charles wrote:
    
    JoshRoss wrote:
    What is this dry-ah thing? Or at the very least, how do you spell it?


    "Dryad is an infrastructure which allows a programmer to use the resources of a computer cluster or a data center for running data-parallel programs. A Dryad programmer can use thousands of machines, each of them with multiple processors or cores, without knowing anything about concurrent programming."


    Andrew Birrell is involved in that project - it must be good.  He also has an Automatic Mutual Exclusion (AME) project for alternative to explicit locks that looks interesting.


    I sense a Going Deep with Andrew in future...


    C


    That would be awesome Charles!!
    I have been big fan ever sense his "Programming Threads in C#" paper.  The first, and best, paper on managed threads and locks (granted I have not got Joe Duffy's book yet).

    Hmmm.  That gives me a crazy dream.  How about a panel talk on Concurrency futures with Joe Duffy, Andrew Birrell, Don Box, Dan Reed, and George Chrysanthakopoulos.  Don tossed in for salt Smiley

  • User profile image
    Charles
    staceyw wrote:
    
    Charles wrote:
    
    staceyw wrote:
    
    Charles wrote:
    
    JoshRoss wrote:
    What is this dry-ah thing? Or at the very least, how do you spell it?


    "Dryad is an infrastructure which allows a programmer to use the resources of a computer cluster or a data center for running data-parallel programs. A Dryad programmer can use thousands of machines, each of them with multiple processors or cores, without knowing anything about concurrent programming."


    Andrew Birrell is involved in that project - it must be good.  He also has an Automatic Mutual Exclusion (AME) project for alternative to explicit locks that looks interesting.


    I sense a Going Deep with Andrew in future...


    C


    That would be awesome Charles!!
    I have been big fan ever sense his "Programming Threads in C#" paper.  The first, and best, paper on managed threads and locks (granted I have not got Joe Duffy's book yet).

    Hmmm.  That gives me a crazy dream.  How about a panel talk on Concurrency futures with Joe Duffy, Andrew Birrell, Don Box, Dan Reed, and George Chrysanthakopoulos.  Don tossed in for salt



    Excellent idea. Let me if see if I can make this happen. I'd want to add Herb Sutter, Erik Meijer and Anders as well. And three cameras.

    Thank you for the suggestion. Let's make this happen.

    C
  • User profile image
    staceyw
    Charles wrote:
    


    Excellent idea. Let me if see if I can make this happen. I'd want to add Herb Sutter, Erik Meijer and Anders as well. And three cameras.

    Thank you for the suggestion. Let's make this happen.

    C


    Oops.  Forgot about Erik and Anders. Many apologies.  They are a must.  That would be so extreme - The Concurrency Dream Team (CDT).
  • User profile image
    ymasuda_

    Differentiating computing unit scale in new decade of Wintel?

    Microsoft has server specific core parallel computing. In other words, Microsoft is developing high scale computing area of mainframe computer architecture, with Intel. Mainframe computers have value differentiation of multi-processors management, and Microsoft has multi-cores management. System buyers may guess past long decade of large scale mainframe versus small scale personal computing.
    Innovative processors development is in different side of hardware business, and given development point is how intelligent software solution may add generic values to multi-processor units under Windows resource management. Let's evaluate how Windows became bigger beside mainframe computers.

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