Game Dev Show 01 - Which Language Should I Program My Game In?

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Description



Hello and welcome to the first episode of the Game Dev Show, I'm @DaveVoyles. Throughout this series we'll have several Microsoft Technical Evangelists, as well as some guests, to introduce you to the concepts behind game development from a number of angles, including the programming, art, and business aspects of game production.

Every Wednesday we'll have a new episode.

In this first episode, I'd like to discuss some of the languages available developers who would like to make games. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but simply a way to pique your interest and get you started.

You can find more information about game development at my blog, DaveVoyles.com, as well as my gaming podcast, IndieDevPodcast.com.

 

 

Tags:

C#, C++, JavaScript, XNA

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The Discussion

  • User profile image
    rodrigorf

    One of the best game dev overview i have ever seen. Thanks!!!

  • User profile image
    Donny V

    I would also check out another great game engine with tons of tools Neoaxis. www.neoaxis.com

    Let's you make games using C#.

  • User profile image
    DaveVoyles

    @Donny V:I hadn't seen this before. I'll look into it now. Thank you! 

  • User profile image
    Roger McKnight

    As a teacher, I'm hoping this GameDevShow would have some very simple examples. In .net I have done lots of simple games - my intro class uses picture boxes (I know, ick) and in my intermediate class, I have used onPaint with timers and stuff that worked really well. Not overly complex, but the students really understand every line of code.

    I have tried jumping into Windows 10, but the environment destroyed a lot of that simple game creation stuff and now it seems that we need to rely on game engines and such.

    I'm hoping that there are still some structures in place so I can have students make something simple like pong with less than 100 lines of code.

    Since there wasn't a post last week, I was thinking that perhaps the team wasn't sure where to start.

    I'd love to also get into some Monogame and Unity stuff, but I'd like to start my creating a pong, hangman or solitaire. Something simple just to explain how to get all of this to work in the new XAML world.

  • User profile image
    DaveVoyles

    Hey Roger,

    We took a week off while trying to plan for the next 10 weeks or so. We'll have episodes on Unity, polishing games (particles and such), UI, VR, interviews at PAX, ec.,

    I started with Pong as my first game as well, and did it in XNA. Today we announced that MonoGame, the open source implementation of XNA is coming to Xbox One / Win 10 as well, with some games through the ID@Xbox program already.

    You shouldn't have to do anything with XAML if you are creating a game for Windows 10. You can do it all through DirectX, or middleware like Unity (which you illustrated), in which case is creates a XAML wrapper for you. 

  • User profile image
    George Birbilis

    CryEngine was just released via pay what you want model. Also see HumbleBundle site for a limited time offer for a ton of assets for CryEngine (from the engine makers themselves)

  • User profile image
    George Birbilis

    How about using a PowerPoint instead of losing time writing stuff and "breaking" the speech while doing it?

  • User profile image
    George Birbilis

    Speaking of CryEngine above, the have CE# layer now (for C#) apart from their native C++ support (and some data flow logic IDE I think too)

  • User profile image
    DaveVoyles

    @George Birbilis:Sure, I could use powerpoint, but they say variety is the spice of life, so I figured I would write this one out instead of putting viewers to sleep with power point.

    Some people are visual learners, so this helps them remember what they see.

  • User profile image
    LernMoment

    Well done overview. Thank you!

  • User profile image
    birbilis

    @DaveVoyles - Well I woudln't mind the handwritten text-diagrams if they were pre-written. In fact I prefer listening to the audio while browsing or writing code, so when it is breaking (pausing while writing [can't be a perfect multitasker]) it is a bit tiring to follow

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