"Kinect v2 Help Me Obi Wan Hologram"

Description

Today's inspirational post is enough to make you drool... Who, at least those of you who read this, wouldn't want to create something like this?

Here's the related post, "3D Movies with Kinect for Windows v2"

Creating 3D movies is easier than ever with the Kinect for Windows v2 sensor

from Vimeo.

If you want to create 3D movies, it’s easier than ever with the Kinect for Windows v2 sensor and its preview software development kit (SDK 2.0 public preview). Improvements include far more depth data from which to construct 3D images, the ability to map color to the 3D image and the opportunity to make 3D videos on a standard laptop.

Knowing that the v2 sensor has a high-definition (1080p) video camera, Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) James Ashley figured he could use the camera’s color images directly, without a workaround tool. He also planned to map the color data to depth positions in real-time, a new capability built into the preview SDK.

Putting these features together, Ashley wrote an app that enabled him to create 3D videos on a standard laptop, which could lead to real-time 3D in video chats.

Ashley, who has a book due out in October, has more development ideas for the v2 sensor, which you can find on the Kinect for Windows Blog.

[Post copied in full]

Project Information URL: http://blogs.microsoft.com/firehose/2014/08/25/creating-3d-movies-is-easier-than-ever-with-the-kinect-for-windows-v2-sensor/

V2 meets 3D 

As Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) James Ashley points out in a recent blog, it’s a whole lot easier to create 3D movies with the Kinect for Windows v2 sensor and its preview software development kit (SDK 2.0 public preview). For starters, the v2 sensor captures up to three times more depth information than the original sensor did. That means you have far more depth data from which to construct your 3D images.

The next big improvement is in the ability to map color to the 3D image. The original Kinect sensor used an SD camera for color capture, and the resulting low-resolution images made it difficult to match the color data to the depth data. (RGB+D, a tool created by James George, Jonathan Porter, and Jonathan Minard, overcame this problem.) Knowing that the v2 sensor has a high-definition (1080p) video camera, Ashley reasoned that he could use the camera's color images directly, without a workaround tool. He also planned to map the color data to depth positions in real-time, a new capability built into the preview SDK.

Putting these features together, Ashley wrote an app that enabled him to create 3D videos on a standard laptop (dual core Intel i5, with 4 GB RAM and an integrated Intel HD Graphics 4400). While he has no plans at present to commercialize the application, he opines that it could be a great way to bring real-time 3D to video chats.

Ashley also speculates that since the underlying principle is a point cloud, stills of the volumetric recording could be converted into surface meshes that can be read by CAD software or even turned into models that could be printed on a 3D printer. He also thinks it could be useful for recording biometric information in a physician’s office, or for recording precise 3D information at a crime scene, for later review.

Those who want to learn more from Ashley about developing cool stuff with the v2 sensor should note that his book, Beginning Kinect Programming with Kinect for Windows v2, is due to be published in October.

Project Information URL: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kinectforwindows/archive/2014/08/22/v2-meets-3d.aspx




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