Coffeehouse Thread

15 posts

The @ was a bad idea...

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  • User profile image
    Dodo

    Helpdesk: Hello, how may I help you?
    Customer: I'm writing an email for my first time.
    Helpdesk: Okay, and where do you have difficulties?
    Customer: It's with the address of my friend. I can find the 'a' but I don't know how to draw this circle around it.

  • User profile image
    Massif

    Along with the "Any" key.

    Also, curiously, the at sign is unique in having no name other than the clumsy multi-word phrase "the at sign".

  • User profile image
    Dodo

    Massif wrote:
    Along with the "Any" key.
    That one's resolved with graphical user interfaces now. And even if it were to be there, you need to press a key it's changed to 'space bar' in most cases. Smiley

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    Massif wrote:
    Along with the "Any" key.

    Also, curiously, the at sign is unique in having no name other than the clumsy multi-word phrase "the at sign".


    It's the "at" key.

    It's no more complicated than the key which produces the letter 'b' : the "b" key. Excepting only "up", isn't it the only key which is uniquely expressed in two letters? (not including function keys)

  • User profile image
    Massif

    You miss my point, which is that the @ symbol doesn't have a proper name.

    Unlike, say ~ (tilde) & (ampersand) and all the others, even though I don't know them.

    Whereas @ is only known by the phrase "the at symbol" because it represents "at". It doesn't actually have a name per-se. (Kinda like & isn't called "the and sign" it's called an ampersand. It's a typographical anomaly, not something to get all het up about though.)

  • User profile image
    dahat

    Massif wrote:
    Along with the "Any" key.


    Bah! It was a good keyboard!

  • User profile image
    yabada
  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    EDIT: Bah... I was beaten too it.

    Correction.

    In English it's called "commercial at".

    In other languages:

    • In Basque it is called a bildua ("rounded a")
    • In Belarusian it's called "сьлімак" ("helix", "snail")
    • In Bulgarian it is called кльомба ("klyomba", means nothing else) or маймунско а (majmunsko a "monkey A").
    • In Catalan it is called arrova.
    • In Chinese
      • In mainland China it is quan a (圈a), meaning "circled a" or hua a (花a, lacy a).
      • In Taiwan it is xiao laoshu (小老鼠), meaning "little mouse", or laoshu hao (老鼠號, "mouse sign").
    • In Croatian it is informally called manki, coming from the local pronunciation of monkey. Curiously, the Croatian word for monkey, majmun, is not used to denote the at sign. This leads many Croatian speakers to believe that the English term for at sign is monkey causing them to misuse the word when communicating in English.
    • In Czech and Slovak it is called zavináč (rollmops).
    • In Danish it is snabel-a ("(elephant's) trunk-a").
    • In Dutch it is called apenstaartje ("little monkey-tail").
    • In Esperanto it is called ĉe-signo ("at" - for the e-mail use, with an address pronounced zamenhof ĉe esperanto punkto org), po-signo ("each" -- refers only to the mathematical use) or heliko ("snail").
    • In Faroese it is kurla (sounds "curly"), hjá ("at"), tranta and snápila ("(elephant's) trunk-a").
    • In Finnish it was originally called taksamerkki ("fee sign") or yksikköhinnan merkki ("unit price sign"), but these names are long obsolete and now rarely understood. Nowadays, it is officially ät-merkki, according to the national standardization institute SFS; frequently also spelled "at-merkki". Other names include kissanhäntä, ("cat's tail") and miukumauku ("the miaow sign").
    • In French it is arobase or arrobe or a commercial (though this is most commonly used in French-speaking Canada, and should normally only be used when quoting prices; it should always be called arobase or, better yet, arobas when in an e-mail address), and sometimes a dans le rond (a in the circle). Same origin as Spanish which could be derived from Arabic, ar-roub. Southern French speakers refer to it as le petit escargot ("little snail") due to its appearance.
    • In German it sometimes used to be referred to as Klammeraffe (meaning "spider monkey"). Klammeraffe refers to the similarity of the @ to the tail of a monkey grabbing a branch. Lately, it is mostly called at just like in English
    • In Greek, it is most often referred to as papaki (παπάκι), meaning "duckling," due to the similarity it bears with comic character designs for ducks.
    • In Greenlandic Inuit language - it is called aajusaq meaning "a-like" or "something that looks like a"
    • In Hebrew it is colloquially known as shtrudel (שטרודל). The normative term, invented by the Academy of the Hebrew Language, is krukhit (כרוכית), which is a Hebrew word for strudel.
    • In Hungarian it is officially called kukac ("worm, mite, or maggot").
    • In Icelandic it is referred to as "at merkið (the at-sign)" or "hjá" which is a direct translation of at.
    • In Indonesian it is et,a bundar, meaning "circle A".
    • In Italian it is chiocciola ("snail") or a commerciale, sometimes at (pronounced more often /ɛt/, and rarely /at/, instead of /æt/) or ad.
    • In Japanese it is called attomāku (アットマーク, "at mark"). The word is a wasei-eigo, which are Japanese vocabulary forged from the English language or Gairaigo foreign loan words in general. It is sometimes called naruto, because of Naruto whirlpool or food (kamaboko).
    • In Korean it is called golbaeng-i (골뱅이; bai top shells), a dialectal form of daseulgi (다슬기), a small freshwater snail with no tentacles.
    • In Latvian it is pronunced same as in English, but, since in Latvian [æ] is written as "e" not "a" (as in English), it's sometimes written as et.
    • In Lithuanian it is eta (equivalent to English at but with Lithuanian ending)
    • In Luxembourgish it used to be called Afeschwanz (monkey-tail), but due to widespread use it is now pronounced 'at' like in English.
    • In Macedonian it is called мајмунче ("majmunche", means little monkey) or мајмунско а (majmunsko a "monkey A").
    • In Morse Code it is known as a "commat," consisting of the Morse code for the "A" and "C" run together as one character: (·--·-·). This occurred in 2004 .
    • In Norwegian it is officially called krøllalfa ("curly alpha" or "alpha twirl"). (The alternate alfakrøll is also common.)
    • In Persian it is at (using the English pronunciation).
    • In Portuguese, while there are regional variations, it is typically considered as representing approximately 25 pounds, 11.5 kg, and both the weight and the symbol are called arroba. In Brazil, cattle are still priced by the arroba — now rounded to 15 kg.
    • In Polish it is officially called atka, but commonly małpa (monkey) or małpka (little monkey), or bałwanek (little snowman)
    • In Romanian it is Coadă de maimuţă (monkey-tail) or "a-rond"
    • In Russian it is most commonly sobaka (собака) (dog).
    • In Serbian it is called лудо А (ludo A crazy A) or мајмун (majmun monkey)
    • In Slovenian it is called afna (little monkey)
    • In Spanish speaking country's it denotes a pre-metric unit of weight. Whilst there are regional variations in Spain and Mexico it is typically considered as representing approximately 25 pounds, 11.5 kg, and both the weight and the symbol are called arroba. It has also been used as a unit of volume for wine and oil.
    • In Swedish it is called snabel-a ("(elephant's) trunk-a"), kanelbulle (cinnamon bun) or simply "at" like in the English language.
    • In Swiss German it is commonly called Affeschwanz ("monkey-tail").
    • In Tagalog it is commonly called utong ("nipple").
    • In Turkish it is et (using the English pronunciation). Also called as güzel a (beautiful a), özel a (special a), salyangoz (snail), koç (ram), kuyruklu a (a with tail) and çengelli a (a with hook).
    • In Ukrainian it is commonly called et ("at"), other names being ravlyk (равлик) (snail), slymachok (слимачок) (little slug), vukho (вухо) (ear) and pesyk (песик) (little dog).
    • In Vietnamese it is called a còng (bent a) in the North and a móc (hooked a) in the South.
    • In Welsh it is sometimes known as a malwen or malwoden (a snail).
    From wiki.



  • User profile image
    Massif

    Alright, alright, forget I mentioned it... Jeez, I just read it somewhere. Tongue Out

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    Not as bad as the woman who called tech support wondering why her mouse doesn't do anything. She was using it as a foot pedal Perplexed

  • User profile image
    Bas

    Little monkey-tail ftw!

  • User profile image
    Lloyd_Humph

    GoddersUK wrote:
    
    • In Welsh it is sometimes known as a malwen or malwoden (a snail).


    No, it isn't... I've *never* heard of anybody use that phrase. It's called an atter up here Smiley

    If Blackberrys are addictive cellphones, Channel9 is the ultimate addictive website.
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  • User profile image
    Lloyd_Humph

    Harlequin wrote:
    Not as bad as the woman who called tech support wondering why her mouse doesn't do anything. She was using it as a foot pedal


    Nothing, did you not head about the dude that let his kid swing off the CD drive + sit on it?

    If Blackberrys are addictive cellphones, Channel9 is the ultimate addictive website.
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  • User profile image
    YearOfThe​LinuxDesktop

    GoddersUK wrote:
    EDIT: Bah... I was beaten too it.

    Correction.

    In English it's called "commercial at".

    In other languages:



    I call it just ASCII code 64.

  • User profile image
    David7738

    Dodo wrote:
    
    Massif wrote:
    Along with the "Any" key.
    That one's resolved with graphical user interfaces now. And even if it were to be there, you need to press a key it's changed to 'space bar' in most cases.


    What I ended up doing was listen for ANY scan code.. this way I'd catch the L/R Shift/ALt/CTRL TAB keys and anything else the user could think of i.e. scroll lock. prtscrn, cursor keys etc.. much better than using getch();

    This turned out to be one of my most used pieces of re-usable code, though it wasn't strictly portable being a small piece of .asm..

    Many people actually thought that 'press a key' meant press the "a" key and nothing else!! Big Smile

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